Regulating away competition: the effect of regulation on entrepreneurship and employment

Regulating away competition: the effect of regulation on entrepreneurship and employment Many scholars have worried that regulation deters entrepreneurship because it increases the cost of entry, reduces innovation in the regulated industry, and benefits large firms because they can overcome the costs of complying with regulations more easily than smaller firms. Using novel data on the extent of US federal regulations by industry and data on firm births and employment from the Statistics of US Businesses, we run fixed effects regressions to show that more-regulated industries experienced fewer new firm births and slower employment growth in the period 1998–2011. Large firms may even successfully lobby government officials to increase regulations to raise their smaller rivals’ costs. We also find that regulations inhibit employment growth in all firms and that large firms are less likely to exit a heavily regulated industry than small firms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Regulatory Economics Springer Journals

Regulating away competition: the effect of regulation on entrepreneurship and employment

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Economics; Industrial Organization; Public Finance; Microeconomics
ISSN
0922-680X
eISSN
1573-0468
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11149-017-9343-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many scholars have worried that regulation deters entrepreneurship because it increases the cost of entry, reduces innovation in the regulated industry, and benefits large firms because they can overcome the costs of complying with regulations more easily than smaller firms. Using novel data on the extent of US federal regulations by industry and data on firm births and employment from the Statistics of US Businesses, we run fixed effects regressions to show that more-regulated industries experienced fewer new firm births and slower employment growth in the period 1998–2011. Large firms may even successfully lobby government officials to increase regulations to raise their smaller rivals’ costs. We also find that regulations inhibit employment growth in all firms and that large firms are less likely to exit a heavily regulated industry than small firms.

Journal

Journal of Regulatory EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 25, 2017

References

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