Regional population structure of the endangered Bridle Shiner (Notropis bifrenatus)

Regional population structure of the endangered Bridle Shiner (Notropis bifrenatus) In the last 100 years, the Bridle Shiner has declined over significant parts of its range. We used mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers to investigate population structure of this species. Tissue samples were collected from populations in six drainages in PA, NJ, NY and CT. One predominant haplotype was observed in the Delaware, Housatonic, Passaic, and Raritan specimens. Specimens from the Hudson and St. Lawrence drainages had a separate unique haplotype. Microsatellite loci revealed low within-population genetic diversity and pairwise population comparisons of allelic divergence showed significant genetic differences among most drainages. Population structure analysis of microsatellite loci recover the same population clusters inferred using mtDNA. Within the Delaware drainage, there was significant differentiation among areas separated by 128 km. Several alternate scenarios of population divergence and population bottlenecks were investigated using approximate Bayesian computing. These supported a scenario with a bottleneck occurring in the ancestral population of Bridle Shiner followed by recent divergence of Northern and Southern drainages. Keywords Notropis bifrenatus · Bridle Shiner · Microsatellites · Phylogeography Introduction Electronic supplementary material The online version of this The Bridle Shiner, Notropis bifrenatus (Cope 1867), is a article (https ://doi.org/10.1007/s1059 2-018-1074-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. minnow (Cyprinidae) found http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Genetics Springer Journals

Regional population structure of the endangered Bridle Shiner (Notropis bifrenatus)

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Conservation Biology/Ecology; Ecology; Biodiversity; Evolutionary Biology; Plant Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1566-0621
eISSN
1572-9737
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10592-018-1074-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the last 100 years, the Bridle Shiner has declined over significant parts of its range. We used mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers to investigate population structure of this species. Tissue samples were collected from populations in six drainages in PA, NJ, NY and CT. One predominant haplotype was observed in the Delaware, Housatonic, Passaic, and Raritan specimens. Specimens from the Hudson and St. Lawrence drainages had a separate unique haplotype. Microsatellite loci revealed low within-population genetic diversity and pairwise population comparisons of allelic divergence showed significant genetic differences among most drainages. Population structure analysis of microsatellite loci recover the same population clusters inferred using mtDNA. Within the Delaware drainage, there was significant differentiation among areas separated by 128 km. Several alternate scenarios of population divergence and population bottlenecks were investigated using approximate Bayesian computing. These supported a scenario with a bottleneck occurring in the ancestral population of Bridle Shiner followed by recent divergence of Northern and Southern drainages. Keywords Notropis bifrenatus · Bridle Shiner · Microsatellites · Phylogeography Introduction Electronic supplementary material The online version of this The Bridle Shiner, Notropis bifrenatus (Cope 1867), is a article (https ://doi.org/10.1007/s1059 2-018-1074-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. minnow (Cyprinidae) found

Journal

Conservation GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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