Regional Analgesia Techniques for Adult Patients Undergoing Solid Organ Transplantation

Regional Analgesia Techniques for Adult Patients Undergoing Solid Organ Transplantation Purpose of review Organ transplantations often include major incisions that can be associated with significant postoperative pain. While these patients may theoretically benefit from regional anesthesia, many practitioners have avoided such techniques due to considerations, such as a low perceived benefit if the patient stays intubated postoperatively and concerns about the coagulation status in patients with end-stage liver/kidney disease and perioperative use of anticoagulation. Recent findings With refinements in both surgical (laparoscopic and robot-assisted procedures) and regional anesthesia tech- niques (ultrasound guidance), new interest in nerve blocks for organ transplantation has emerged and flourished. Summary While neuraxial anesthesia continues to be used, albeit less frequently for solid organ transplantation, peripheral nerve blocks and paravertebral blocks, in contrast, have increasingly been employed and studied. Specifically, transversus abdominis plane blocks and related fascial plane block techniques are safe to perform and easy to learn. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks are starting to rival the versatility and the widespread use of epidural analgesia with comparable results and lower risk, but validation in various settings is still needed. . . . . . Keywords Regional anesthesia Neuraxial anesthesia Peripheral nerve block Liver transplantation Kidney transplantation Pancreas transplantation Introduction This review will focus on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Anesthesiology Reports Springer Journals

Regional Analgesia Techniques for Adult Patients Undergoing Solid Organ Transplantation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/regional-analgesia-techniques-for-adult-patients-undergoing-solid-8TYsQ3mrty
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Anesthesiology; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Internal Medicine
eISSN
2167-6275
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40140-018-0274-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of review Organ transplantations often include major incisions that can be associated with significant postoperative pain. While these patients may theoretically benefit from regional anesthesia, many practitioners have avoided such techniques due to considerations, such as a low perceived benefit if the patient stays intubated postoperatively and concerns about the coagulation status in patients with end-stage liver/kidney disease and perioperative use of anticoagulation. Recent findings With refinements in both surgical (laparoscopic and robot-assisted procedures) and regional anesthesia tech- niques (ultrasound guidance), new interest in nerve blocks for organ transplantation has emerged and flourished. Summary While neuraxial anesthesia continues to be used, albeit less frequently for solid organ transplantation, peripheral nerve blocks and paravertebral blocks, in contrast, have increasingly been employed and studied. Specifically, transversus abdominis plane blocks and related fascial plane block techniques are safe to perform and easy to learn. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks are starting to rival the versatility and the widespread use of epidural analgesia with comparable results and lower risk, but validation in various settings is still needed. . . . . . Keywords Regional anesthesia Neuraxial anesthesia Peripheral nerve block Liver transplantation Kidney transplantation Pancreas transplantation Introduction This review will focus on the

Journal

Current Anesthesiology ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 20, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off