Recovery from stress: an experimental examination of focused attention meditation in novices

Recovery from stress: an experimental examination of focused attention meditation in novices Identifying strategies that aid in recovery from stress may benefit cardiovascular health. Ninety-nine undergraduate meditation novices were randomly assigned to meditate, listen to an audio book, or sit quietly after a standardized stressor. During recovery, meditators’ heart rate variability and skin conductance levels returned to baseline, whereas only heart rate variability returned to baseline for the audio book and control groups. Positive and negative affect were no different than baseline following meditation, whereas, both audio book and control groups had lower positive affect and higher negative affect following the intervention. Findings suggest that the sympathetic nervous system is uniquely affected by meditation, and novices may benefit emotionally from meditating after a stressor. Further research is needed to determine meditation’s utility in recovering from stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Behavioral Medicine Springer Journals

Recovery from stress: an experimental examination of focused attention meditation in novices

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Health Psychology; General Practice / Family Medicine
ISSN
0160-7715
eISSN
1573-3521
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10865-018-9932-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Identifying strategies that aid in recovery from stress may benefit cardiovascular health. Ninety-nine undergraduate meditation novices were randomly assigned to meditate, listen to an audio book, or sit quietly after a standardized stressor. During recovery, meditators’ heart rate variability and skin conductance levels returned to baseline, whereas only heart rate variability returned to baseline for the audio book and control groups. Positive and negative affect were no different than baseline following meditation, whereas, both audio book and control groups had lower positive affect and higher negative affect following the intervention. Findings suggest that the sympathetic nervous system is uniquely affected by meditation, and novices may benefit emotionally from meditating after a stressor. Further research is needed to determine meditation’s utility in recovering from stress.

Journal

Journal of Behavioral MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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