Recent advances in actinorhizal symbiosis signaling

Recent advances in actinorhizal symbiosis signaling Nitrogen and phosphorus availability are frequent limiting factors in plant growth and development. Certain bacteria and fungi form root endosymbiotic relationships with plants enabling them to exploit atmospheric nitrogen and soil phosphorus. The relationships between bacteria and plants include nitrogen-fixing Gram-negative proteobacteria called rhizobia that are able to interact with most leguminous plants (Fabaceae) but also with the non-legume Parasponia (Cannabaceae), and actinobacteria Frankia, which are able to interact with about 260 species collectively called actinorhizal plants. Fungi involved in the relationship with plants include Glomeromycota that form an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association intracellularly within the roots of more than 80 % of land plants. Increasing numbers of reports suggest that the rhizobial association with legumes has recycled part of the ancestral program used by most plants to interact with AM fungi. This review focuses on the most recent progress made in plant genetic control of root nodulation that occurs in non-legume actinorhizal plant species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Recent advances in actinorhizal symbiosis signaling

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-016-0450-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nitrogen and phosphorus availability are frequent limiting factors in plant growth and development. Certain bacteria and fungi form root endosymbiotic relationships with plants enabling them to exploit atmospheric nitrogen and soil phosphorus. The relationships between bacteria and plants include nitrogen-fixing Gram-negative proteobacteria called rhizobia that are able to interact with most leguminous plants (Fabaceae) but also with the non-legume Parasponia (Cannabaceae), and actinobacteria Frankia, which are able to interact with about 260 species collectively called actinorhizal plants. Fungi involved in the relationship with plants include Glomeromycota that form an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association intracellularly within the roots of more than 80 % of land plants. Increasing numbers of reports suggest that the rhizobial association with legumes has recycled part of the ancestral program used by most plants to interact with AM fungi. This review focuses on the most recent progress made in plant genetic control of root nodulation that occurs in non-legume actinorhizal plant species.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 12, 2016

References

  • AP2-ERF transcription factors mediate Nod factor-dependent Mt ENOD11 activation in root hairs via a novel cis-regulatory motif
    Andriankaja, A; Boisson-Demier, A; Frances, L; Sauviac, L; Jauneau, A; Barker, D; Carvalho-Niebel, F
  • A nuclear factor Y interacting protein of the GRAS family is required for nodule organogenesis, infection thread progression, and lateral root growth
    Battaglia, M; Rípodas, C; Clúa, J; Baudin, M; Aguilar, OM; Niebel, A; Zanetti, ME; Blanco, FA

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