Ranitidine

Ranitidine Reactions 1704, p331 - 2 Jun 2018 DRESS syndrome: case report A 16-year-old boy developed DRESS syndrome during treatment with ranitidine [route, indication and dosage not stated]. The boy, who had a history of tetralogy of Fallot received extensive treatment for Streptococcus mitis infective endocarditis in the hospital and eventually underwent a pulmonary valve replacement. Eighteen days after the pulmonary valve replacement, he developed a facial oedema, progressively extensive maculopapular exanthema with pronounced petechial and purpuric lesions on the limbs and mild mucosal involvement. He had fever and palpable cervical lymphadenopathy. Over the next 72 hours, he developed eosinophilia, leucopenia, renal impairment and deranged liver function. He had received numerous medications in the five weeks prior to the onset of exanthema. In the first two weeks of admission, he was started on vancomycin, meropenem, rifampicin, gentamicin and ceftriaxone. Three weeks prior to the onset of skin eruption, he received ranitidine, enoxaparin sodium [enoxaparin], temazepam, ibuprofen, furosemide, spironolactone and paracetamol. A histologic examination showed perivascular inflammatory infiltration and eosinophils, which were consistent with a drug eruption. His virus and bacteria serology investigations were unremarkable. A definite diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was made on the basis of a RegiSCAR score of 6. All of the boy’s medications were discontinued, five days following the onset of DRESS. He received treatment with topical steroids. This led to a complete resolution of DRESS syndrome after three weeks. Nine months later, he underwent intradermal tests (IDT) and patch test (PT) with all enlisted medications for identifying the aetiology of his DRESS syndrome. A delayed IDT with ranitidine (1:100 dilution) resulted in a focal papulovesicular eruption at 96 hours with a crescendo effect after 48 hours. The PT also resulted in a strong positive reaction to ranitidine. On the basis of the clinical features (RegiSCAR criteria), temporal relationship, biopsy findings and remarkably positive IDT and PT to ranitidine, he was diagnosed with ranitidine-induced DRESS syndrome. Author comment: "He was diagnosed with DRESS syndrome due to ranitidine based on the temporal relationship, clinical features (RegiSCAR criteria), biopsy outcome, and crucially the dual positive IDT and PT to Watts TJ, et al. DRESS Syndrome Induced by Ranitidine. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice 6: 1030-1031, No. 3, May-Jun 2018. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2017.09.019 - United Kingdom 803323711 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Ranitidine

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1704 (1) – Jun 2, 2018
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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40278-018-46974-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1704, p331 - 2 Jun 2018 DRESS syndrome: case report A 16-year-old boy developed DRESS syndrome during treatment with ranitidine [route, indication and dosage not stated]. The boy, who had a history of tetralogy of Fallot received extensive treatment for Streptococcus mitis infective endocarditis in the hospital and eventually underwent a pulmonary valve replacement. Eighteen days after the pulmonary valve replacement, he developed a facial oedema, progressively extensive maculopapular exanthema with pronounced petechial and purpuric lesions on the limbs and mild mucosal involvement. He had fever and palpable cervical lymphadenopathy. Over the next 72 hours, he developed eosinophilia, leucopenia, renal impairment and deranged liver function. He had received numerous medications in the five weeks prior to the onset of exanthema. In the first two weeks of admission, he was started on vancomycin, meropenem, rifampicin, gentamicin and ceftriaxone. Three weeks prior to the onset of skin eruption, he received ranitidine, enoxaparin sodium [enoxaparin], temazepam, ibuprofen, furosemide, spironolactone and paracetamol. A histologic examination showed perivascular inflammatory infiltration and eosinophils, which were consistent with a drug eruption. His virus and bacteria serology investigations were unremarkable. A definite diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was made on the basis of a RegiSCAR score of 6. All of the boy’s medications were discontinued, five days following the onset of DRESS. He received treatment with topical steroids. This led to a complete resolution of DRESS syndrome after three weeks. Nine months later, he underwent intradermal tests (IDT) and patch test (PT) with all enlisted medications for identifying the aetiology of his DRESS syndrome. A delayed IDT with ranitidine (1:100 dilution) resulted in a focal papulovesicular eruption at 96 hours with a crescendo effect after 48 hours. The PT also resulted in a strong positive reaction to ranitidine. On the basis of the clinical features (RegiSCAR criteria), temporal relationship, biopsy findings and remarkably positive IDT and PT to ranitidine, he was diagnosed with ranitidine-induced DRESS syndrome. Author comment: "He was diagnosed with DRESS syndrome due to ranitidine based on the temporal relationship, clinical features (RegiSCAR criteria), biopsy outcome, and crucially the dual positive IDT and PT to Watts TJ, et al. DRESS Syndrome Induced by Ranitidine. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice 6: 1030-1031, No. 3, May-Jun 2018. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2017.09.019 - United Kingdom 803323711 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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