Race/ethnic differentials in heavy weight and cesarean births

Race/ethnic differentials in heavy weight and cesarean births Objectives: The general objectives of this research are tofurther our understanding of the distribution and incidence of heavy weight births and to examine differentials in the use of cesarean section as a response to macrosomia in models that are more broadly comparative by race/ethnicity than any that have heretofore been estimated. Methods: The data are drawn from the combined 1989–1991 NCHS Linked Birth/Infant Death Cohort Files,a data set of over 12 million live births and over 100,000 infant deaths that allows for highly reliable estimations for relatively small race/ethnic sub populations. Results: The results confirm that previously identified determinants of macrosomia such as maternal diabetes,maternal weight gain, parity and a previous heavy weight infant are highly predictive of a macrosomic birth, independent of race/ethnic effects. With respect to the management of heavy weight births, race/ethnic differentials exist in the odds of a cesarean delivery, theprocedure most often used to limit the risks of a macrosomic delivery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Race/ethnic differentials in heavy weight and cesarean births

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Geography; Demography; Economic Policy; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1010656522963
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives: The general objectives of this research are tofurther our understanding of the distribution and incidence of heavy weight births and to examine differentials in the use of cesarean section as a response to macrosomia in models that are more broadly comparative by race/ethnicity than any that have heretofore been estimated. Methods: The data are drawn from the combined 1989–1991 NCHS Linked Birth/Infant Death Cohort Files,a data set of over 12 million live births and over 100,000 infant deaths that allows for highly reliable estimations for relatively small race/ethnic sub populations. Results: The results confirm that previously identified determinants of macrosomia such as maternal diabetes,maternal weight gain, parity and a previous heavy weight infant are highly predictive of a macrosomic birth, independent of race/ethnic effects. With respect to the management of heavy weight births, race/ethnic differentials exist in the odds of a cesarean delivery, theprocedure most often used to limit the risks of a macrosomic delivery.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

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