Qubit from the editor

Qubit from the editor Quantum Inf Process (2011) 10:719–720 DOI 10.1007/s11128-011-0305-3 FORWARD Ron Folman Received: 26 August 2011 / Published online: 21 September 2011 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Dear friends, When Howard Brandt approached me and suggested that I act as guest editor for a special issue on quantum computing, I hesitated. Beyond the usual lack of time, I hesitated since it does not seem that we are close to a working device with significant capabilities, at least yet. Nevertheless, I eventually agreed as I felt it would be helpful to review the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentyfirst century and to take a broad view of the existing roadmaps. In addition, I have no doubt that in the process of working towards the quantum computer we are gaining new insight into theoretical and experimental physics and this too makes such a special issue attractive. Quantum computing has always fascinated me for reasons far beyond the impres- sive technological ability to achieve complex quantum preparation, manipulation and measurement. My interest also lies beyond the rewards of quantum computing as they may present themselves in quantum algorithms that have been or will be constructed. The appreciation I have for the field http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quantum Information Processing Springer Journals

Qubit from the editor

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Physics; Quantum Physics; Computer Science, general; Mathematics, general; Theoretical, Mathematical and Computational Physics; Physics, general
ISSN
1570-0755
eISSN
1573-1332
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11128-011-0305-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quantum Inf Process (2011) 10:719–720 DOI 10.1007/s11128-011-0305-3 FORWARD Ron Folman Received: 26 August 2011 / Published online: 21 September 2011 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Dear friends, When Howard Brandt approached me and suggested that I act as guest editor for a special issue on quantum computing, I hesitated. Beyond the usual lack of time, I hesitated since it does not seem that we are close to a working device with significant capabilities, at least yet. Nevertheless, I eventually agreed as I felt it would be helpful to review the state-of-the-art at the beginning of the twentyfirst century and to take a broad view of the existing roadmaps. In addition, I have no doubt that in the process of working towards the quantum computer we are gaining new insight into theoretical and experimental physics and this too makes such a special issue attractive. Quantum computing has always fascinated me for reasons far beyond the impres- sive technological ability to achieve complex quantum preparation, manipulation and measurement. My interest also lies beyond the rewards of quantum computing as they may present themselves in quantum algorithms that have been or will be constructed. The appreciation I have for the field

Journal

Quantum Information ProcessingSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 21, 2011

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