Quantum search in structured database using local adiabatic evolution and spectral methods

Quantum search in structured database using local adiabatic evolution and spectral methods Since Grover’s seminal work which provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, quantum search has been studied in great detail. We propose a new method for designing quantum search algorithms for finding a marked element in the state space of a graph. The algorithm is based on a local adiabatic evolution of the Hamiltonian associated with the graph. The main new idea is to apply some techniques such as Krylov subspace projection methods, Lanczos algorithm and spectral distribution methods. Indeed, using these techniques together with the second-order perturbation theory, we give a systematic method for calculating the approximate search time at which the marked state can be reached. That is, for any undirected regular connected graph which is considered as the state space of the database, the introduced algorithm provides a systematic and programmable way for evaluation of the search time, in terms of the corresponding graph polynomials. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quantum Information Processing Springer Journals

Quantum search in structured database using local adiabatic evolution and spectral methods

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Physics; Quantum Information Technology, Spintronics; Quantum Computing; Data Structures, Cryptology and Information Theory; Quantum Physics; Mathematical Physics
ISSN
1570-0755
eISSN
1573-1332
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11128-013-0563-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since Grover’s seminal work which provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, quantum search has been studied in great detail. We propose a new method for designing quantum search algorithms for finding a marked element in the state space of a graph. The algorithm is based on a local adiabatic evolution of the Hamiltonian associated with the graph. The main new idea is to apply some techniques such as Krylov subspace projection methods, Lanczos algorithm and spectral distribution methods. Indeed, using these techniques together with the second-order perturbation theory, we give a systematic method for calculating the approximate search time at which the marked state can be reached. That is, for any undirected regular connected graph which is considered as the state space of the database, the introduced algorithm provides a systematic and programmable way for evaluation of the search time, in terms of the corresponding graph polynomials.

Journal

Quantum Information ProcessingSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 20, 2013

References

  • Quantum search algorithms
    Ambainis, A.

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