Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Trends of Urban Sprawl Among Large U.S. Metropolitan Areas Via Spatial Metrics

Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Trends of Urban Sprawl Among Large U.S. Metropolitan Areas Via... Spatial metrics have emerged as a widely utilized tool to quantify urban morphologies and monitor urban sprawl. Since previous applications of spatial metrics have typically considered only a single urban class, this study evaluates how deriving spatial metrics from multiple land use/land cover (LULC) classification schemes can help elucidate the spatiotemporal trends of urban sprawl. Specifically, the urban morphologies of the fifty most populous metropolitan areas in the U.S. were quantified in 2001 and 2011 using spatial metrics derived from two LULC classification schemes: the more common urban/non-urban binary and a non-binary that considered four urban classes individually. The results indicated that many of the spatial metrics were significantly correlated with existing sprawl indices, suggesting that they accurately quantified components of urban form associated with urban sprawl. More sprawl-like morphologies were typically located in the Eastern region of the U.S. although the regional variability of select spatial metrics was dependent on the LULC classification scheme. Over the 10-year study period, spatial metric-based sprawl indices that compared the relative abundance of low and high intensity urban development suggested that sprawl attributable to low-density single family residential suburbs generally decreased among most metropolitan areas. However, detailed case studies revealed that sprawling development was still likely increasing within particular metros in the form of strip commercial development. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of considering multiple classification schemes to maximize the utility of spatial metrics for urban morphological analysis and urban planning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy Springer Journals

Quantifying the Spatiotemporal Trends of Urban Sprawl Among Large U.S. Metropolitan Areas Via Spatial Metrics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/quantifying-the-spatiotemporal-trends-of-urban-sprawl-among-large-u-s-u53hYDmc0i
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Social Sciences; Human Geography; Landscape/Regional and Urban Planning; Regional/Spatial Science
ISSN
1874-463X
eISSN
1874-4621
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12061-016-9190-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial metrics have emerged as a widely utilized tool to quantify urban morphologies and monitor urban sprawl. Since previous applications of spatial metrics have typically considered only a single urban class, this study evaluates how deriving spatial metrics from multiple land use/land cover (LULC) classification schemes can help elucidate the spatiotemporal trends of urban sprawl. Specifically, the urban morphologies of the fifty most populous metropolitan areas in the U.S. were quantified in 2001 and 2011 using spatial metrics derived from two LULC classification schemes: the more common urban/non-urban binary and a non-binary that considered four urban classes individually. The results indicated that many of the spatial metrics were significantly correlated with existing sprawl indices, suggesting that they accurately quantified components of urban form associated with urban sprawl. More sprawl-like morphologies were typically located in the Eastern region of the U.S. although the regional variability of select spatial metrics was dependent on the LULC classification scheme. Over the 10-year study period, spatial metric-based sprawl indices that compared the relative abundance of low and high intensity urban development suggested that sprawl attributable to low-density single family residential suburbs generally decreased among most metropolitan areas. However, detailed case studies revealed that sprawling development was still likely increasing within particular metros in the form of strip commercial development. Overall, the findings highlight the importance of considering multiple classification schemes to maximize the utility of spatial metrics for urban morphological analysis and urban planning.

Journal

Applied Spatial Analysis and PolicySpringer Journals

Published: May 23, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off