Pyruvate Kinase M2 Increases Angiogenesis, Neurogenesis, and Functional Recovery Mediated by Upregulation of STAT3 and Focal Adhesion Kinase Activities After Ischemic Stroke in Adult Mice

Pyruvate Kinase M2 Increases Angiogenesis, Neurogenesis, and Functional Recovery Mediated by... Ischemic stroke remains a serious threat to human life. Generation of neuronal and vascular cells is an endogenous regenerative mechanism in the adult brain, which may contribute to tissue repair after stroke. However, the regenerative activity is typically insufficient for significant therapeutic effects after brain injuries. Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a key regulator for energy metabolism. PKM2 also has nonmetabolic roles involving regulations of gene expression, cell proliferation, and migration in cancer cells as well as noncancerous cells. In a focal ischemic stroke mouse model, recombinant PKM2 (rPKM2) administration (160 ng/kg, intranasal delivery) at 1 h after stroke showed the significant effect of a reduced infarct volume of more the 60%. Delayed treatment of rPKM2, however, lost the acute neuroprotective effect. We then tested a novel hypothesis that delayed treatment of PKM2 might show proregenerative effects for long-term functional recovery and this chronic action could be mediated by its downstream STAT3 signaling. rPKM2 (160 ng/kg) was delivered to the brain using noninvasive intranasal administration 24 h after the stroke and repeated every other day. Western blot analysis revealed that, 7 days after the stroke, the levels of PKM2 and phosphorylated STAT3 and the expression of angiogenic factors http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurotherapeutics Springer Journals

Pyruvate Kinase M2 Increases Angiogenesis, Neurogenesis, and Functional Recovery Mediated by Upregulation of STAT3 and Focal Adhesion Kinase Activities After Ischemic Stroke in Adult Mice

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology; Neurosurgery; Neurobiology
ISSN
1933-7213
eISSN
1878-7479
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13311-018-0635-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ischemic stroke remains a serious threat to human life. Generation of neuronal and vascular cells is an endogenous regenerative mechanism in the adult brain, which may contribute to tissue repair after stroke. However, the regenerative activity is typically insufficient for significant therapeutic effects after brain injuries. Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a key regulator for energy metabolism. PKM2 also has nonmetabolic roles involving regulations of gene expression, cell proliferation, and migration in cancer cells as well as noncancerous cells. In a focal ischemic stroke mouse model, recombinant PKM2 (rPKM2) administration (160 ng/kg, intranasal delivery) at 1 h after stroke showed the significant effect of a reduced infarct volume of more the 60%. Delayed treatment of rPKM2, however, lost the acute neuroprotective effect. We then tested a novel hypothesis that delayed treatment of PKM2 might show proregenerative effects for long-term functional recovery and this chronic action could be mediated by its downstream STAT3 signaling. rPKM2 (160 ng/kg) was delivered to the brain using noninvasive intranasal administration 24 h after the stroke and repeated every other day. Western blot analysis revealed that, 7 days after the stroke, the levels of PKM2 and phosphorylated STAT3 and the expression of angiogenic factors

Journal

NeurotherapeuticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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