Pygmalion in instruction? Tracking, teacher reward structures, and educational inequality

Pygmalion in instruction? Tracking, teacher reward structures, and educational inequality Soc Psychol Educ https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-018-9452-z Pygmalion in instruction? Tracking, teacher reward structures, and educational inequality Ida Gran Andersen Received: 9 November 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track loca- tion. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort and achievement across tracks. Differences in grading practices determine incentive structures for student behavior and educational investments and thus may be an important mechanism in explaining track effects on academic achievement. I apply student fixed effects mod - els across tracks to the NELS:88 and find that, first, track placement affects achieve - ment, second, although grading practices affect achievement, they only explain a minor part of the track effect, and, third, teacher expectations and perceived class ability level explain the positive track effect for high-track students. These findings suggest that high-track students have higher achievement because their teachers per- ceive them as better students. Keywords Curricular tracking · Teacher reward structures · Pygmalion effects · Educational inequality 1 Introduction In the sociology of education, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Psychology of Education Springer Journals

Pygmalion in instruction? Tracking, teacher reward structures, and educational inequality

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Education; Education, general; Personality and Social Psychology; Sociology of Education
ISSN
1381-2890
eISSN
1573-1928
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11218-018-9452-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Soc Psychol Educ https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-018-9452-z Pygmalion in instruction? Tracking, teacher reward structures, and educational inequality Ida Gran Andersen Received: 9 November 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2018 © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018 Abstract I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track loca- tion. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort and achievement across tracks. Differences in grading practices determine incentive structures for student behavior and educational investments and thus may be an important mechanism in explaining track effects on academic achievement. I apply student fixed effects mod - els across tracks to the NELS:88 and find that, first, track placement affects achieve - ment, second, although grading practices affect achievement, they only explain a minor part of the track effect, and, third, teacher expectations and perceived class ability level explain the positive track effect for high-track students. These findings suggest that high-track students have higher achievement because their teachers per- ceive them as better students. Keywords Curricular tracking · Teacher reward structures · Pygmalion effects · Educational inequality 1 Introduction In the sociology of education,

Journal

Social Psychology of EducationSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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