Prosodic words in cyclic derivation: the strange case of Murrinhpatha compound verbs

Prosodic words in cyclic derivation: the strange case of Murrinhpatha compound verbs Lexical compounding generally works by adjoining a second lexeme either directly to the stem of the first lexeme (as in [sabre-[tooth]]-s), or to the whole inflected form of the first lexeme (as in [milk-[teeth]]). Murrinhpatha presents a third distinct type, where the adjoined lexeme is attached to a prosodic edge, which may occur either before or after various inflectional affixes, rather than attaching to a fixed morphosyntactic host. “Prosodic compounding” of this type has not been previously attested in natural language. However, I argue that in Stratal Phonology (Bermúdez-Otero 2016), where prosodic constituents are formed and reformed on distinct morphological strata, we may formulate a motivated account in which prosodic compounding fills a typological gap. This account of Murrinhpatha verb morphology offers a structurally motivated alternative to previous accounts that posit a purely stipulative morphotactic template. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Morphology Springer Journals

Prosodic words in cyclic derivation: the strange case of Murrinhpatha compound verbs

Morphology , Volume 27 (3) – Jun 21, 2017
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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Linguistics; Linguistics, general; Comparative Linguistics; Phonology; Sign Language
ISSN
1871-5621
eISSN
1871-5656
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11525-017-9303-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lexical compounding generally works by adjoining a second lexeme either directly to the stem of the first lexeme (as in [sabre-[tooth]]-s), or to the whole inflected form of the first lexeme (as in [milk-[teeth]]). Murrinhpatha presents a third distinct type, where the adjoined lexeme is attached to a prosodic edge, which may occur either before or after various inflectional affixes, rather than attaching to a fixed morphosyntactic host. “Prosodic compounding” of this type has not been previously attested in natural language. However, I argue that in Stratal Phonology (Bermúdez-Otero 2016), where prosodic constituents are formed and reformed on distinct morphological strata, we may formulate a motivated account in which prosodic compounding fills a typological gap. This account of Murrinhpatha verb morphology offers a structurally motivated alternative to previous accounts that posit a purely stipulative morphotactic template.

Journal

MorphologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 21, 2017

References

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