Projecting present and future habitat suitability of ship-mediated aquatic invasive species in the Canadian Arctic

Projecting present and future habitat suitability of ship-mediated aquatic invasive species in... A rise in Arctic shipping activity resulting from global warming and resource exploitation is expected to increase the likelihood of aquatic invasive species (AIS) introductions in the region. In this context, the potential threat of future AIS incursions at a Canadian Arctic regional scale was examined. Habitat suitability under current environmental conditions and future climate change scenarios was projected for a subset of eight potential invaders ranked as having a high risk of establishment in the Canadian Arctic based on dispersal pathways/donor regions, biological attributes and invasion history: (1) Amphibalanus improvisus, (2) Botrylloides violaceus, (3) Caprella mutica, (4) Carcinus maenas, (5) Littorina littorea, (6) Membranipora membranacea, (7) Mya arenaria and (8) Paralithodes camtschaticus. Habitat modelling was performed using MaxEnt based on globally known native and non-native occurrence records and environmental ranges for these species. Results showed that under current environmental conditions the habitat is suitable in certain regions of the Canadian Arctic such as the Hudson Complex and Beaufort Sea for L. littorea, M. arenaria and P. camtschaticus. Under a future climate change scenario, all species showed poleward gains in habitat suitability with at least some regions of the Canadian Arctic projected to be suitable for the complete suite of species modelled. The use of these models is helpful in understanding potential future AIS incursions as a result of climate change and shipping at large spatial scales. These approaches can aid in the identification of high risk regions and species to allow for more focused AIS monitoring and research efforts in response to climate change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Projecting present and future habitat suitability of ship-mediated aquatic invasive species in the Canadian Arctic

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/projecting-present-and-future-habitat-suitability-of-ship-mediated-CbhBMVqRRl
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing AG
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10530-017-1553-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A rise in Arctic shipping activity resulting from global warming and resource exploitation is expected to increase the likelihood of aquatic invasive species (AIS) introductions in the region. In this context, the potential threat of future AIS incursions at a Canadian Arctic regional scale was examined. Habitat suitability under current environmental conditions and future climate change scenarios was projected for a subset of eight potential invaders ranked as having a high risk of establishment in the Canadian Arctic based on dispersal pathways/donor regions, biological attributes and invasion history: (1) Amphibalanus improvisus, (2) Botrylloides violaceus, (3) Caprella mutica, (4) Carcinus maenas, (5) Littorina littorea, (6) Membranipora membranacea, (7) Mya arenaria and (8) Paralithodes camtschaticus. Habitat modelling was performed using MaxEnt based on globally known native and non-native occurrence records and environmental ranges for these species. Results showed that under current environmental conditions the habitat is suitable in certain regions of the Canadian Arctic such as the Hudson Complex and Beaufort Sea for L. littorea, M. arenaria and P. camtschaticus. Under a future climate change scenario, all species showed poleward gains in habitat suitability with at least some regions of the Canadian Arctic projected to be suitable for the complete suite of species modelled. The use of these models is helpful in understanding potential future AIS incursions as a result of climate change and shipping at large spatial scales. These approaches can aid in the identification of high risk regions and species to allow for more focused AIS monitoring and research efforts in response to climate change.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 7, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off