Progress monitoring: an integral part of instruction

Progress monitoring: an integral part of instruction Read Writ (2007) 20:535–537 DOI 10.1007/s11145-007-9053-2 Kristi Santi Æ Sharon Vaughn Published online: 22 May 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Assessment for accountability purposes is a current theme in education. While many would argue that accountability provides an opportunity for schools and districts to take stock of how effectively students are learning and to disaggregate findings for student groups to assure that learning is occurring for all students, there are others who debate the practice of accountability with particular concerns about the use of a ‘‘one-time’’ measurement and the potential misuse and overemphasis on ‘‘test preparation’’. Despite the likely ongoing discussions about accountability, ongoing student monitoring through teacher administered progress monitoring measures appears to be a practice that is less debated for its effectiveness. In classrooms across the United States, teachers are increasingly asked to administer progress monitoring assessments—particularly to low performing students. Most would agree that this is time well spent—particularly if teachers use the data to inform instructional decisions and thus student learning is improved. Many of the assessments teachers give can be powerful instructional tools. To realize their potential, teachers need to understand and effectively use these assessments. However, too often teachers aren’t fully trained http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reading and Writing Springer Journals

Progress monitoring: an integral part of instruction

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Linguistics; Language and Literature; Psycholinguistics; Education, general; Neurology; Literacy
ISSN
0922-4777
eISSN
1573-0905
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11145-007-9053-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Read Writ (2007) 20:535–537 DOI 10.1007/s11145-007-9053-2 Kristi Santi Æ Sharon Vaughn Published online: 22 May 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Assessment for accountability purposes is a current theme in education. While many would argue that accountability provides an opportunity for schools and districts to take stock of how effectively students are learning and to disaggregate findings for student groups to assure that learning is occurring for all students, there are others who debate the practice of accountability with particular concerns about the use of a ‘‘one-time’’ measurement and the potential misuse and overemphasis on ‘‘test preparation’’. Despite the likely ongoing discussions about accountability, ongoing student monitoring through teacher administered progress monitoring measures appears to be a practice that is less debated for its effectiveness. In classrooms across the United States, teachers are increasingly asked to administer progress monitoring assessments—particularly to low performing students. Most would agree that this is time well spent—particularly if teachers use the data to inform instructional decisions and thus student learning is improved. Many of the assessments teachers give can be powerful instructional tools. To realize their potential, teachers need to understand and effectively use these assessments. However, too often teachers aren’t fully trained

Journal

Reading and WritingSpringer Journals

Published: May 22, 2007

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