Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress, Kyoto, Japan, September 8-11, 2010

Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress, Kyoto, Japan, September 8-11, 2010 Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S500 B Academy of Molecular Imaging and Society for Molecular Imaging, 2010 Mol Imaging Biol (2010) 12 (Suppl 2):S509900YS1636 DOI: 10.1007/s11307-010-0453-3 Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S501 Presentation Number 0002 Educational Workshop 2: Animal Imaging in Translational Medicine Animal Imaging in Drug Discovery and Development 1 2 3 2 1 Raymond E. Gibson , Christopher T. Winkelmann , Elaine Jagoda , Shailendra Patel , Gibson Imaging Apps, LLC, Holland, PA, 2 3 USA; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. Contact e-mail: raymond_gibson@comcast.net With the desire to develop novel drugs faster and more cost-effectively, drug companies are searching for clear strategies to manage the complex drug discovery process in terms of balancing costs, time, product value and possibility of success. To this end, pharmaceutical companies have turned to imaging, be it radiotracer imaging (PET and SPECT), magnetic resonance techniques (MRI, fMRI, and MRS), CT, ultrasound and optical imaging, as the means to determine the efficacy of drugs more quickly. Alternatively, imaging techniques may generate biomarkers that can demonstrate target engagement, important for the proof-of-principle studies the encourage further development of the putative drug entity. We have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Imaging and Biology Springer Journals

Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress, Kyoto, Japan, September 8-11, 2010

Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress, Kyoto, Japan, September 8-11, 2010

Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S500 B Academy of Molecular Imaging and Society for Molecular Imaging, 2010 Mol Imaging Biol (2010) 12 (Suppl 2):S509900YS1636 DOI: 10.1007/s11307-010-0453-3 Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S501 Presentation Number 0002 Educational Workshop 2: Animal Imaging in Translational Medicine Animal Imaging in Drug Discovery and Development 1 2 3 2 1 Raymond E. Gibson , Christopher T. Winkelmann , Elaine Jagoda , Shailendra Patel , Gibson Imaging Apps, LLC, Holland, PA, 2 3 USA; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. Contact e-mail: raymond_gibson@comcast.net With the desire to develop novel drugs faster and more cost-effectively, drug companies are searching for clear strategies to manage the complex drug discovery process in terms of balancing costs, time, product value and possibility of success. To this end, pharmaceutical companies have turned to imaging, be it radiotracer imaging (PET and SPECT), magnetic resonance techniques (MRI, fMRI, and MRS), CT, ultrasound and optical imaging, as the means to determine the efficacy of drugs more quickly. Alternatively, imaging techniques may generate biomarkers that can demonstrate target engagement, important for the proof-of-principle studies the encourage further development of the putative drug entity. We have used all of these technologies, with an emphasis on radiotracer imaging, and will provide example of the preclinical uses of each. A key feature of drug development is hypothesis testing: at an appropriate dose, does the putative drug provide the desired therapeutic effect? This dose may be predicted by determining the maximum dose that can be given without side-effects, or estimated from animal studies where target-site occupancy is determined via post-mortem sampling. A more satisfying approach is to determine the fractional site occupancy, as a function of plasma concentration of drug, via blockade of in vivo...
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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Academy of Molecular Imaging and Society for Molecular Imaging
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Imaging / Radiology
ISSN
1536-1632
eISSN
1860-2002
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11307-010-0453-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S500 B Academy of Molecular Imaging and Society for Molecular Imaging, 2010 Mol Imaging Biol (2010) 12 (Suppl 2):S509900YS1636 DOI: 10.1007/s11307-010-0453-3 Proceedings of the 2010 World Molecular Imaging Congress S501 Presentation Number 0002 Educational Workshop 2: Animal Imaging in Translational Medicine Animal Imaging in Drug Discovery and Development 1 2 3 2 1 Raymond E. Gibson , Christopher T. Winkelmann , Elaine Jagoda , Shailendra Patel , Gibson Imaging Apps, LLC, Holland, PA, 2 3 USA; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. Contact e-mail: raymond_gibson@comcast.net With the desire to develop novel drugs faster and more cost-effectively, drug companies are searching for clear strategies to manage the complex drug discovery process in terms of balancing costs, time, product value and possibility of success. To this end, pharmaceutical companies have turned to imaging, be it radiotracer imaging (PET and SPECT), magnetic resonance techniques (MRI, fMRI, and MRS), CT, ultrasound and optical imaging, as the means to determine the efficacy of drugs more quickly. Alternatively, imaging techniques may generate biomarkers that can demonstrate target engagement, important for the proof-of-principle studies the encourage further development of the putative drug entity. We have

Journal

Molecular Imaging and BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 11, 2010

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