Problems of Coloniality, Modularity, and Individuality in Sponges and Special Features of Their Morphogeneses During Growth and Asexual Reproduction

Problems of Coloniality, Modularity, and Individuality in Sponges and Special Features of Their... A comparative analysis of the organization of sponges has been carried out to clarify problems of their coloniality, individuality, and modularity. The morphological, physiological, morphogenetic, and immunological aspects of the problem have been analyzed. The followers of the hypothesis of colonial organization of sponges interpret the process of “new zooid” formation as an “incomplete asexual reproduction.” A comparative analysis of morphogeneses in sponges during growth processes and asexual reproduction has clearly shown them to be different. A rearrangement (remodeling) of structures accompanied by disorganization and reorganization of tissues in neighboring elements of aquiferous system is the basis of growth. Migration of polypotent and secretory cells into the core of bud development is the major mechanism of budding. The formation of new aquiferous units (aquiferous modules) does not represent an “incomplete asexual reproduction.” Thus, the terms “colony” and “zooid” cannot be applied to the sponges. A morphologically separate sponge, irrespective of its level of organization (ascon, sycon, or leucon) and the number of oscula (aquiferous modules) should be considered as an individual. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Problems of Coloniality, Modularity, and Individuality in Sponges and Special Features of Their Morphogeneses During Growth and Asexual Reproduction

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUMB.0000011716.90730.ac
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A comparative analysis of the organization of sponges has been carried out to clarify problems of their coloniality, individuality, and modularity. The morphological, physiological, morphogenetic, and immunological aspects of the problem have been analyzed. The followers of the hypothesis of colonial organization of sponges interpret the process of “new zooid” formation as an “incomplete asexual reproduction.” A comparative analysis of morphogeneses in sponges during growth processes and asexual reproduction has clearly shown them to be different. A rearrangement (remodeling) of structures accompanied by disorganization and reorganization of tissues in neighboring elements of aquiferous system is the basis of growth. Migration of polypotent and secretory cells into the core of bud development is the major mechanism of budding. The formation of new aquiferous units (aquiferous modules) does not represent an “incomplete asexual reproduction.” Thus, the terms “colony” and “zooid” cannot be applied to the sponges. A morphologically separate sponge, irrespective of its level of organization (ascon, sycon, or leucon) and the number of oscula (aquiferous modules) should be considered as an individual.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2004

References

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