Prevalence of Nausea and Vomiting in Adults Using Ropinirole: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Prevalence of Nausea and Vomiting in Adults Using Ropinirole: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Background Nausea and vomiting are commonly associated with medication use. Dopaminergic agonists have been associ- ated with these symptoms, but their impact in patients without Parkinson’s disease, such as those with restless legs syndrome (RLS), is not well characterized. Aims We sought to determine whether the non-ergoline dopamine agonist ropinirole is associated with nausea and vomiting in adults with RLS. Methods We conducted a systematic review using PUBMED, EMBASE, and clinical trial databases to identify placebo- controlled clinical trials of ropinirole for RLS treatment. We extracted data including dosing schedule and the proportion of patients reporting nausea and/or vomiting. We also determined hazard ratios (HR) using a random effects proportional hazard model. Results We extracted data from a pool of 13 studies. The prevalence of nausea in the ropinirole-treated RLS group (RLS-R; N = 1528) was 37.2% compared to 9.4% in the placebo-treated RLS group (RLS-P; N = 1395) (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of vomiting in the RLS-R group was 10.9% compared to 2.6% in the RLS-P group (p < 0.0001). Ropinirole use was asso- ciated with a higher risk of reporting nausea (HR 5.924 [4.410–7.959], p < 0.001) and experiencing vomiting (HR 4.628 [3.035–7.057], p < 0.0001). Nausea and vomiting represented nearly 50% of all adverse events reported. Conclusions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Digestive Diseases and Sciences Springer Journals

Prevalence of Nausea and Vomiting in Adults Using Ropinirole: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gastroenterology; Hepatology; Oncology; Transplant Surgery; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0163-2116
eISSN
1573-2568
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10620-018-4937-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Nausea and vomiting are commonly associated with medication use. Dopaminergic agonists have been associ- ated with these symptoms, but their impact in patients without Parkinson’s disease, such as those with restless legs syndrome (RLS), is not well characterized. Aims We sought to determine whether the non-ergoline dopamine agonist ropinirole is associated with nausea and vomiting in adults with RLS. Methods We conducted a systematic review using PUBMED, EMBASE, and clinical trial databases to identify placebo- controlled clinical trials of ropinirole for RLS treatment. We extracted data including dosing schedule and the proportion of patients reporting nausea and/or vomiting. We also determined hazard ratios (HR) using a random effects proportional hazard model. Results We extracted data from a pool of 13 studies. The prevalence of nausea in the ropinirole-treated RLS group (RLS-R; N = 1528) was 37.2% compared to 9.4% in the placebo-treated RLS group (RLS-P; N = 1395) (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of vomiting in the RLS-R group was 10.9% compared to 2.6% in the RLS-P group (p < 0.0001). Ropinirole use was asso- ciated with a higher risk of reporting nausea (HR 5.924 [4.410–7.959], p < 0.001) and experiencing vomiting (HR 4.628 [3.035–7.057], p < 0.0001). Nausea and vomiting represented nearly 50% of all adverse events reported. Conclusions

Journal

Digestive Diseases and SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 30, 2018

References

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