Prevalence and Correlates of Worry About Medical Imaging Radiation Among United States Cancer Survivors

Prevalence and Correlates of Worry About Medical Imaging Radiation Among United States Cancer... Purpose Cancer survivors undergo lifelong surveillance regimens that involve repeated diagnostic medical imaging. As many of these diagnostic tests use ionizing radiation, which may modestly increase cancer risks, they may present a source of worry for survivors. The aims of this paper are to describe cancer survivors’ level of worry about medical imaging radiation (MIR) and to identify patterns of MIR worry across subgroups defined by cancer type, other medical and demographic factors, and physician trust. Method This cross-sectional study used the 2012–2013 Health Information National Trends Survey of US adults conducted by the National Cancer Institute. The analysis focused on the 452 respondents identifying as cancer survivors. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate factors associated with higher MIR worry (reporting Bsome^ or Balot^ of MIR worry). Results Nearly half (42%) of the sample reported higher worry about MIR. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regressions indicated higher rates of MIR worry among those with lower incomes, those who self-reported poorer health, and those who completed cancer treatment within the past 10 years. Receipt of radiation treatment was associated with higher MIR worry in unadjusted analysis. Conclusion Worries about MIR are relatively common among cancer survivors. An accurate assessment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Behavioral Medicine Springer Journals

Prevalence and Correlates of Worry About Medical Imaging Radiation Among United States Cancer Survivors

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by International Society of Behavioral Medicine
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Health Psychology; General Practice / Family Medicine
ISSN
1070-5503
eISSN
1532-7558
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12529-018-9730-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Cancer survivors undergo lifelong surveillance regimens that involve repeated diagnostic medical imaging. As many of these diagnostic tests use ionizing radiation, which may modestly increase cancer risks, they may present a source of worry for survivors. The aims of this paper are to describe cancer survivors’ level of worry about medical imaging radiation (MIR) and to identify patterns of MIR worry across subgroups defined by cancer type, other medical and demographic factors, and physician trust. Method This cross-sectional study used the 2012–2013 Health Information National Trends Survey of US adults conducted by the National Cancer Institute. The analysis focused on the 452 respondents identifying as cancer survivors. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate factors associated with higher MIR worry (reporting Bsome^ or Balot^ of MIR worry). Results Nearly half (42%) of the sample reported higher worry about MIR. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regressions indicated higher rates of MIR worry among those with lower incomes, those who self-reported poorer health, and those who completed cancer treatment within the past 10 years. Receipt of radiation treatment was associated with higher MIR worry in unadjusted analysis. Conclusion Worries about MIR are relatively common among cancer survivors. An accurate assessment

Journal

International Journal of Behavioral MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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