Preface

Preface Plant Molecular Biology 42: vii–ix, 2000. vii © 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. In one sense or another, everything in life is about evolution. Certainly, it is widely accepted that evolution is a primary force that shapes the natural world, starting at the level of individual molecules and building from there to genotypes and the phenotypes they underlie, to populations, species, and still higher taxonomic categories. At the lower end of that spectrum, dynamic in their own right but molded in turn by evolutionary patterns of species, are the complex interrelationships of multigene families. Evolution has always played a part in molecular biology, albeit often in a fairly understated way as in the concept of ‘conserved’ motifs – TATA boxes and the like. But that role has become increasingly important, as more and more genes from more and more taxa have been described. We are now in the era of comparative genomics, and ‘evolutionary’ might justifiably be substituted for ‘comparative’. And evolutionary biology is increasingly able to meet the needs of molecular biologists. While development, physiology, and other fields have been transformed by the molecular revolution, evolution and systematics (the study of the kinds and diversity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Preface

Plant Molecular Biology , Volume 42 (1) – Oct 16, 2004
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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1017208011666
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Plant Molecular Biology 42: vii–ix, 2000. vii © 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. In one sense or another, everything in life is about evolution. Certainly, it is widely accepted that evolution is a primary force that shapes the natural world, starting at the level of individual molecules and building from there to genotypes and the phenotypes they underlie, to populations, species, and still higher taxonomic categories. At the lower end of that spectrum, dynamic in their own right but molded in turn by evolutionary patterns of species, are the complex interrelationships of multigene families. Evolution has always played a part in molecular biology, albeit often in a fairly understated way as in the concept of ‘conserved’ motifs – TATA boxes and the like. But that role has become increasingly important, as more and more genes from more and more taxa have been described. We are now in the era of comparative genomics, and ‘evolutionary’ might justifiably be substituted for ‘comparative’. And evolutionary biology is increasingly able to meet the needs of molecular biologists. While development, physiology, and other fields have been transformed by the molecular revolution, evolution and systematics (the study of the kinds and diversity

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

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