Post-invasion demography and persistence of a novel functional species in an estuarine system

Post-invasion demography and persistence of a novel functional species in an estuarine system Long-term population data of marine invaders are rarely collected although it provides fundamental knowledge of the invasion dynamics that is important for evaluating the impacts, interactions and range expansion of the invader and for management purposes. During a 6-year monitoring period, we studied the dynamics and population demographic characteristics of the newly introduced mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii. The overall abundance of R. harrisii appeared to follow the boom and bust pattern with a rapid initial abundance increase and subsequent decline. The recruitment and growth of juveniles were correlated with the temperature during the larval period indicating that the increase in water temperature caused by climate change could have a positive effect on the recruitment and have potentially facilitated the establishment of R. harrisii in the northern Baltic Sea. The changes in the survival of reproductive females influence most the growth rate of the studied population. Hence, native predators feeding on benthic fauna such as fish could regulate the population growth of R. harrisii in the study area by reducing female survival. Although the population size seems to be stabilized at the monitoring locations, R. harrisii continues to expand its distribution range, and the rapid initial population increase is likely occurring at newly invaded sites. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Invasions Springer Journals

Post-invasion demography and persistence of a novel functional species in an estuarine system

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Sciences; Developmental Biology
ISSN
1387-3547
eISSN
1573-1464
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10530-018-1777-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Long-term population data of marine invaders are rarely collected although it provides fundamental knowledge of the invasion dynamics that is important for evaluating the impacts, interactions and range expansion of the invader and for management purposes. During a 6-year monitoring period, we studied the dynamics and population demographic characteristics of the newly introduced mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii. The overall abundance of R. harrisii appeared to follow the boom and bust pattern with a rapid initial abundance increase and subsequent decline. The recruitment and growth of juveniles were correlated with the temperature during the larval period indicating that the increase in water temperature caused by climate change could have a positive effect on the recruitment and have potentially facilitated the establishment of R. harrisii in the northern Baltic Sea. The changes in the survival of reproductive females influence most the growth rate of the studied population. Hence, native predators feeding on benthic fauna such as fish could regulate the population growth of R. harrisii in the study area by reducing female survival. Although the population size seems to be stabilized at the monitoring locations, R. harrisii continues to expand its distribution range, and the rapid initial population increase is likely occurring at newly invaded sites.

Journal

Biological InvasionsSpringer Journals

Published: May 31, 2018

References

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