Positive end-expiratory pressure-induced increase in external jugular venous pressure does not predict fluid responsiveness in laparoscopic prostatectomy

Positive end-expiratory pressure-induced increase in external jugular venous pressure does not... Background Dynamic change in central venous pressure (CVP) was associated with fluid responsiveness. External jugular venous pressure (EJVP) may reliably estimate CVP and have the advantages of being less invasive. We investigated whether increase in EJVP induced by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) could be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Methods Fifty patients who underwent RALP with steep Trendelenburg position were enrolled. PEEP of 10 cmH O was applied for 5 min and then 300 ml of colloid was administered. EJVP, stroke volume variation (SVV), and cardiac index calculated by pulse contour method were measured before and after the PEEP challenge and colloid administration. Increase in cardiac index > 10% was used to define the fluid responsiveness. Results Twenty-six patients were fluid responders. Neither the increase in EJVP after the initial PEEP nor SVV was signifi - cantly different between responders and non-responders. They were not significantly correlated with an increase in cardiac index. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of these two variables were not significantly greater than 0.5. However, a post hoc analysis revealed that AUC of a decrease in EJVP after removal of PEEP was significantly greater than 0.50. Conclusion Our http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Anesthesia Springer Journals

Positive end-expiratory pressure-induced increase in external jugular venous pressure does not predict fluid responsiveness in laparoscopic prostatectomy

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Publisher
Springer Japan
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Anesthesiology; Pain Medicine; Intensive / Critical Care Medicine; Emergency Medicine
ISSN
0913-8668
eISSN
1438-8359
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00540-018-2475-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Dynamic change in central venous pressure (CVP) was associated with fluid responsiveness. External jugular venous pressure (EJVP) may reliably estimate CVP and have the advantages of being less invasive. We investigated whether increase in EJVP induced by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) could be a reliable predictor of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). Methods Fifty patients who underwent RALP with steep Trendelenburg position were enrolled. PEEP of 10 cmH O was applied for 5 min and then 300 ml of colloid was administered. EJVP, stroke volume variation (SVV), and cardiac index calculated by pulse contour method were measured before and after the PEEP challenge and colloid administration. Increase in cardiac index > 10% was used to define the fluid responsiveness. Results Twenty-six patients were fluid responders. Neither the increase in EJVP after the initial PEEP nor SVV was signifi - cantly different between responders and non-responders. They were not significantly correlated with an increase in cardiac index. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of these two variables were not significantly greater than 0.5. However, a post hoc analysis revealed that AUC of a decrease in EJVP after removal of PEEP was significantly greater than 0.50. Conclusion Our

Journal

Journal of AnesthesiaSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 27, 2018

References

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