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Population-level trends in the distribution of body mass index in Canada, 2000–2014

Population-level trends in the distribution of body mass index in Canada, 2000–2014 Objective Research studying population-level body mass index (BMI) trends document increases in mean or prevalence of overweight/obese but less consideration has been given to describing the changing distribution of BMI. The objective of this research was to perform a detailed analysis of changes in the BMI distribution in Canada. Methods Using data from the CCHS (2000–2014), we analyzed distributional parameters of BMI for 492,886 adults aged 25– 64 years. We further stratified these analyses for women and men, education level, and region of residence. Results Mean BMI has increased for most subgroups of the Canadian population. Mean BMI values were higher for men, while standard deviation (SD) of the BMI distribution was systematically higher in women. Increases in mean BMI were accompanied with increases in SD of BMI across cycles. Across survey cycles, the 95th percentile increased more than 10 times more rapidly compared to the 5th percentile, showing a very unequal change between extreme values in the BMI distribution over time. There was a relationship between SD with BMI, but these relations were generally not different between educational categories and regions. This suggests that the growing inter-individual inequalities (i.e., dispersion) in BMI were not solely attributable to socioeconomic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian Journal of Public Health Springer Journals

Population-level trends in the distribution of body mass index in Canada, 2000–2014

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Canadian Public Health Association
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health
ISSN
0008-4263
eISSN
1920-7476
DOI
10.17269/s41997-018-0060-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective Research studying population-level body mass index (BMI) trends document increases in mean or prevalence of overweight/obese but less consideration has been given to describing the changing distribution of BMI. The objective of this research was to perform a detailed analysis of changes in the BMI distribution in Canada. Methods Using data from the CCHS (2000–2014), we analyzed distributional parameters of BMI for 492,886 adults aged 25– 64 years. We further stratified these analyses for women and men, education level, and region of residence. Results Mean BMI has increased for most subgroups of the Canadian population. Mean BMI values were higher for men, while standard deviation (SD) of the BMI distribution was systematically higher in women. Increases in mean BMI were accompanied with increases in SD of BMI across cycles. Across survey cycles, the 95th percentile increased more than 10 times more rapidly compared to the 5th percentile, showing a very unequal change between extreme values in the BMI distribution over time. There was a relationship between SD with BMI, but these relations were generally not different between educational categories and regions. This suggests that the growing inter-individual inequalities (i.e., dispersion) in BMI were not solely attributable to socioeconomic

Journal

Canadian Journal of Public HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References