Pollution in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan, and its biological consequences

Pollution in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan, and its biological consequences This review summarizes information published in the 1980s–1990s about anthropogenic pollution in Peter the Great Bay, the largest of the bays in the northwestern part of the Sea of Japan. The coastal zone of the bay occupies about 12% of the area of Primorskii Province and is the most heavily populated. The bulk of the human settlements, the seaports of Vladivostok and Nakhodka, railways, industrial enterprises, and developed agriculture are located in the coastal zone. Sewage waters containing multicomponent mixtures of polluting agents of both mineral and organic origin are discharged into the coastal waters of the bay. This paper presents information about the concentration of major classes of polluting agents (oil hydrocarbons, polychlorinated hydrocarbons, surfactants, heavy metals, and radionuclids) in the water and bottom sediments of the bay. The results of physico-chemical and biogeochemical investigations performed in the 1970s–1990s justify considering Zolotoi Rog Bay, Bosfor Vostochnyi Strait, Nakhodka Bay (especially its innermost portion, around the harbor of Nakhodka), and Amurskii Bay to be the most polluted areas in Peter the Great Bay. The information about the biological consequences of pollution in these water areas is briefly reviewed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Pollution in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan, and its biological consequences

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF02759533
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This review summarizes information published in the 1980s–1990s about anthropogenic pollution in Peter the Great Bay, the largest of the bays in the northwestern part of the Sea of Japan. The coastal zone of the bay occupies about 12% of the area of Primorskii Province and is the most heavily populated. The bulk of the human settlements, the seaports of Vladivostok and Nakhodka, railways, industrial enterprises, and developed agriculture are located in the coastal zone. Sewage waters containing multicomponent mixtures of polluting agents of both mineral and organic origin are discharged into the coastal waters of the bay. This paper presents information about the concentration of major classes of polluting agents (oil hydrocarbons, polychlorinated hydrocarbons, surfactants, heavy metals, and radionuclids) in the water and bottom sediments of the bay. The results of physico-chemical and biogeochemical investigations performed in the 1970s–1990s justify considering Zolotoi Rog Bay, Bosfor Vostochnyi Strait, Nakhodka Bay (especially its innermost portion, around the harbor of Nakhodka), and Amurskii Bay to be the most polluted areas in Peter the Great Bay. The information about the biological consequences of pollution in these water areas is briefly reviewed.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 18, 2007

References

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