Pollinator trapping in selfing carnivorous plants, Drosera makinoi and D. toyoakensis (Droseraceae)

Pollinator trapping in selfing carnivorous plants, Drosera makinoi and D. toyoakensis (Droseraceae) Carnivorous plants use insects not only as prey, but also as pollinators. Whereas outcrossing carnivorous plants are known to avoid trapping pollinators, selfing carnivorous plants may capture the pollinators as prey. Here, we provide evidence that two selfing carnivorous plant species with short flower-trap separation, Drosera makinoi (white-colored flowers) and D. toyoakensis (pink-colored flowers), caught some major pollinator species belonging to Diptera and Hymenoptera: four out of five species in D. makinoi and one out of six species in D. toyoakensis. We also tested the function of flowers to attract pollinator or prey insects by experimentally removing Drosera flowers. Flower removal did not significantly affect the number of trapped insects. On the other hand, the removal of flowers of co-flowering neighbor plants, Eriocaulon decemflorum for D. makinoi and Lysimachia fortunei for D. toyoakensis, significantly decreased the number of trapped insects. This finding suggests an exploitative relationship between Drosera spp. and co-flowering species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Research Springer Journals

Pollinator trapping in selfing carnivorous plants, Drosera makinoi and D. toyoakensis (Droseraceae)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/pollinator-trapping-in-selfing-carnivorous-plants-drosera-makinoi-and-i5jBQVdRTE
Publisher
Springer Japan
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Ecological Society of Japan
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Plant Sciences; Zoology; Evolutionary Biology; Behavioral Sciences; Forestry
ISSN
0912-3814
eISSN
1440-1703
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11284-018-1572-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carnivorous plants use insects not only as prey, but also as pollinators. Whereas outcrossing carnivorous plants are known to avoid trapping pollinators, selfing carnivorous plants may capture the pollinators as prey. Here, we provide evidence that two selfing carnivorous plant species with short flower-trap separation, Drosera makinoi (white-colored flowers) and D. toyoakensis (pink-colored flowers), caught some major pollinator species belonging to Diptera and Hymenoptera: four out of five species in D. makinoi and one out of six species in D. toyoakensis. We also tested the function of flowers to attract pollinator or prey insects by experimentally removing Drosera flowers. Flower removal did not significantly affect the number of trapped insects. On the other hand, the removal of flowers of co-flowering neighbor plants, Eriocaulon decemflorum for D. makinoi and Lysimachia fortunei for D. toyoakensis, significantly decreased the number of trapped insects. This finding suggests an exploitative relationship between Drosera spp. and co-flowering species.

Journal

Ecological ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 12, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial