Points of view: Why male cannibalism won't cause a female-biased OSR -- a comment on Smith and Wootton's paper

Points of view: Why male cannibalism won't cause a female-biased OSR -- a comment on Smith and... Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 8, 93±98 (1998) Points of view Why male cannibalism won't cause a female- biased OSR ± a comment on Smith and Wootton's paper CH ARLOTTA K VA RNEMO Department of Zoology, the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia Keywords: brood cannibalism, operational sex ratio, sexual selection Smith and Wootton (1995) dealt with cannibalism in ®sh, in relation to a model by Clutton-Brock and Parker (1992) on operational sex ratio (OSR). Here I comment on Smith and Wootton's paper, and explain why I disagree with some of their conclusions. Firstly, however, to provide a theoretical background to my arguments, I will summarise Clutton-Brock and Parker's model (1992) and explain some applications of OSR. The concept of OSR (the ratio of males to females ready to mate), ®rst discussed by Emlen and Oring (1977), is a central tool in explaining variation in sex-roles and intensity in mating competition (Clutton-Brock and Parker, 1992; Andersson, 1994; Andersson and Iwasa, 1996; Reynolds, 1996). In recent years, this concept has become prominent in empirical studies and has received considerable theoretical attention (Clutton-Brock and Vincent, 1991; Clutton-Brock and Parker, 1992; Owens and Thompson, 1994; Parker and Simmons, 1996). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Points of view: Why male cannibalism won't cause a female-biased OSR -- a comment on Smith and Wootton's paper

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Chapman and Hall
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1008816601559
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 8, 93±98 (1998) Points of view Why male cannibalism won't cause a female- biased OSR ± a comment on Smith and Wootton's paper CH ARLOTTA K VA RNEMO Department of Zoology, the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia Keywords: brood cannibalism, operational sex ratio, sexual selection Smith and Wootton (1995) dealt with cannibalism in ®sh, in relation to a model by Clutton-Brock and Parker (1992) on operational sex ratio (OSR). Here I comment on Smith and Wootton's paper, and explain why I disagree with some of their conclusions. Firstly, however, to provide a theoretical background to my arguments, I will summarise Clutton-Brock and Parker's model (1992) and explain some applications of OSR. The concept of OSR (the ratio of males to females ready to mate), ®rst discussed by Emlen and Oring (1977), is a central tool in explaining variation in sex-roles and intensity in mating competition (Clutton-Brock and Parker, 1992; Andersson, 1994; Andersson and Iwasa, 1996; Reynolds, 1996). In recent years, this concept has become prominent in empirical studies and has received considerable theoretical attention (Clutton-Brock and Vincent, 1991; Clutton-Brock and Parker, 1992; Owens and Thompson, 1994; Parker and Simmons, 1996).

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2004

References

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