Plant virus transmission by plasmodiophorid fungi is associated with distinctive transmembrane regions of virus-encoded proteins

Plant virus transmission by plasmodiophorid fungi is associated with distinctive transmembrane... Computer analysis of published sequence data has consistently identified two complementary transmembrane domains in the coat protein readthrough domains of benyviruses, furoviruses and pomoviruses and in the P2 proteins of bymoviruses. These viruses differ in genome organisation but are all transmitted by plasmodiophorid fungi. The second domain is absent or disrupted in naturally-occurring deletion mutants that cannot be fungally-transmitted. In a non-transmissible substitution mutant of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (Tamada et al. (1996) J Gen Virol 77: 1359–1367), the alignment of the helices is disrupted. From conserved patterns detected in transmembrane helix sequences and calculated relative helix tilts, structural arrangements consistent with tight packing of transmembrane helices were identified. These included ridge/groove arrangements between the two helices and strong electrostatic associations at the interfacial regions of the membrane. The data strongly suggest that these transmembrane helices facilitate the movement of virus particles across the fungal membrane. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Plant virus transmission by plasmodiophorid fungi is associated with distinctive transmembrane regions of virus-encoded proteins

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Springer-Verlag/Wien
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s007050170111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Computer analysis of published sequence data has consistently identified two complementary transmembrane domains in the coat protein readthrough domains of benyviruses, furoviruses and pomoviruses and in the P2 proteins of bymoviruses. These viruses differ in genome organisation but are all transmitted by plasmodiophorid fungi. The second domain is absent or disrupted in naturally-occurring deletion mutants that cannot be fungally-transmitted. In a non-transmissible substitution mutant of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (Tamada et al. (1996) J Gen Virol 77: 1359–1367), the alignment of the helices is disrupted. From conserved patterns detected in transmembrane helix sequences and calculated relative helix tilts, structural arrangements consistent with tight packing of transmembrane helices were identified. These included ridge/groove arrangements between the two helices and strong electrostatic associations at the interfacial regions of the membrane. The data strongly suggest that these transmembrane helices facilitate the movement of virus particles across the fungal membrane.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2001

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