Phytochemical composition and in vitro antioxidant potential of Cynodon dactylon leaf and rhizome extracts as affected by drying methods and temperatures

Phytochemical composition and in vitro antioxidant potential of Cynodon dactylon leaf and rhizome... The effect of five drying methods including shade drying (SHD), solar drying (SOD), and oven drying at 30 (OD30), 40 (OD40) and 50 °C (OD50) on the phytochemical composition and antioxidant potential of C. dactylon leaf and rhizome was assessed. Among drying methods, OD50 resulted in the shortest drying time (18.3 and 12 h for rhizome and leaf, respectively), when compared with SHD and SOD. Based on GC–MS analyses, 15 and 17 constituents were identified in leaf and rhizome extracts, respectively, accounting for ~ 99% of all components. Fatty acids (palmitic acid and linoleic acid) along with their methyl esters (ethyl palmitate, ethyl linoleate and ethyl oleate) and other derivatives (dihomo-γ-linoleic acid) were the main identified constituents shortly after drying procedures; however, other components such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, maltol, retinol and phytol were also traced. Some of C. dactylon phytochemicals including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and ethyl linoleate were sensitive to high drying temperatures. Besides, higher drying temperatures lead to the production or increasing the level of substances such as 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran, tricyclopentadeca-3,7-dien and 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one and diacetin. Based on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay, the IC50 values were generally higher (significance level of 0.05) for oven-dried rhizome compared with shade-dried leaves and rhizomes that quenched more than 84% of the DPPH at the concentration of 400 mg/ml (IC50 59.12). Our findings suggest that OD30 is a versatile drying method not only to reduce drying time but also to preserve the main phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of C. dactylon during dehydration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science and Technology Springer Journals

Phytochemical composition and in vitro antioxidant potential of Cynodon dactylon leaf and rhizome extracts as affected by drying methods and temperatures

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Publisher
Springer India
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India)
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Nutrition; Chemistry/Food Science, general
ISSN
0022-1155
eISSN
0975-8402
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13197-018-3139-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effect of five drying methods including shade drying (SHD), solar drying (SOD), and oven drying at 30 (OD30), 40 (OD40) and 50 °C (OD50) on the phytochemical composition and antioxidant potential of C. dactylon leaf and rhizome was assessed. Among drying methods, OD50 resulted in the shortest drying time (18.3 and 12 h for rhizome and leaf, respectively), when compared with SHD and SOD. Based on GC–MS analyses, 15 and 17 constituents were identified in leaf and rhizome extracts, respectively, accounting for ~ 99% of all components. Fatty acids (palmitic acid and linoleic acid) along with their methyl esters (ethyl palmitate, ethyl linoleate and ethyl oleate) and other derivatives (dihomo-γ-linoleic acid) were the main identified constituents shortly after drying procedures; however, other components such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, maltol, retinol and phytol were also traced. Some of C. dactylon phytochemicals including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and ethyl linoleate were sensitive to high drying temperatures. Besides, higher drying temperatures lead to the production or increasing the level of substances such as 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran, tricyclopentadeca-3,7-dien and 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one and diacetin. Based on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay, the IC50 values were generally higher (significance level of 0.05) for oven-dried rhizome compared with shade-dried leaves and rhizomes that quenched more than 84% of the DPPH at the concentration of 400 mg/ml (IC50 59.12). Our findings suggest that OD30 is a versatile drying method not only to reduce drying time but also to preserve the main phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of C. dactylon during dehydration.

Journal

Journal of Food Science and TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 25, 2018

References

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