Photosynthetic activity and photoprotection in green and red leaves of the seagrasses, Halophila ovalis and Cymodocea rotundata: implications for the photoprotective role of anthocyanin

Photosynthetic activity and photoprotection in green and red leaves of the seagrasses, Halophila... Although anthocyanin accumulation is common among intertidal seagrasses in the tropical bioregions, its physiological role remains to be elucidated. While several works suggested that leaf anthocyanin plays a photoprotective role, others concluded that it compensates for lower capacity of other photoprotective mechanisms. To test the photoprotection hypothesis, we assessed the physiological responses of the seagrasses, Halophila ovalis and Cymodocea rotundata, which exhibit green (anthocyanin poor) and red (anthocyanin rich) plants in the same meadow. Diurnal variations in maximum quantum yield showed similar level of photoinhibition between the green and red leaves. Greater effective quantum yield and chlorophyll b/a ratio detected in the red leaves of H. ovalis suggest shade acclimation. The red leaves of C. rotundata had lower xanthophyll content and de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle than the green leaves while the red leaves of H. ovalis contained higher xanthophyll content than the green leaves. The red leaves of C. rotundata displayed higher activity of ascorbate peroxidase and lower total reactive oxygen species, whereas, no significant difference in oxidative stress-related parameters between green and red leaves of H. ovalis was detected. Our results demonstrate that although anthocyanin appears to contribute to photoprotection by acting as sunscreen, it does not confer greater tolerance to high irradiance in H. ovalis and C. rotundata and anthocyanic seagrasses are not limited in their capacity for other photoprotective mechanisms. It is concluded that green-leafed and red-leafed seagrasses cope equally well with high light in their natural settings by utilizing different combinations of photoprotective mechanisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Biology Springer Journals

Photosynthetic activity and photoprotection in green and red leaves of the seagrasses, Halophila ovalis and Cymodocea rotundata: implications for the photoprotective role of anthocyanin

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/photosynthetic-activity-and-photoprotection-in-green-and-red-leaves-of-idgDQIgBqm
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Environment; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Oceanography; Microbiology; Zoology
ISSN
0025-3162
eISSN
1432-1793
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00227-017-3215-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although anthocyanin accumulation is common among intertidal seagrasses in the tropical bioregions, its physiological role remains to be elucidated. While several works suggested that leaf anthocyanin plays a photoprotective role, others concluded that it compensates for lower capacity of other photoprotective mechanisms. To test the photoprotection hypothesis, we assessed the physiological responses of the seagrasses, Halophila ovalis and Cymodocea rotundata, which exhibit green (anthocyanin poor) and red (anthocyanin rich) plants in the same meadow. Diurnal variations in maximum quantum yield showed similar level of photoinhibition between the green and red leaves. Greater effective quantum yield and chlorophyll b/a ratio detected in the red leaves of H. ovalis suggest shade acclimation. The red leaves of C. rotundata had lower xanthophyll content and de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle than the green leaves while the red leaves of H. ovalis contained higher xanthophyll content than the green leaves. The red leaves of C. rotundata displayed higher activity of ascorbate peroxidase and lower total reactive oxygen species, whereas, no significant difference in oxidative stress-related parameters between green and red leaves of H. ovalis was detected. Our results demonstrate that although anthocyanin appears to contribute to photoprotection by acting as sunscreen, it does not confer greater tolerance to high irradiance in H. ovalis and C. rotundata and anthocyanic seagrasses are not limited in their capacity for other photoprotective mechanisms. It is concluded that green-leafed and red-leafed seagrasses cope equally well with high light in their natural settings by utilizing different combinations of photoprotective mechanisms.

Journal

Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 18, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off