Photochemical analysis of structural transitions in DNA liquid crystals reveals differences in spatial structure of DNA molecules organized in liquid crystalline form

Photochemical analysis of structural transitions in DNA liquid crystals reveals differences in... The anisotropic shape of DNA molecules allows them to form lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) at high concentrations. This liquid crystalline arrangement is also found in vivo (e.g., in bacteriophage capsids, bacteria or human sperm nuclei). However, the role of DNA liquid crystalline organization in living organisms still remains an open question. Here we show that in vitro, the DNA spatial structure is significantly changed in mesophases compared to non-organized DNA molecules. DNA LCs were prepared from pBluescript SK (pBSK) plasmid DNA and investigated by photochemical analysis of structural transitions (PhAST). We reveal significant differences in the probability of UV-induced pyrimidine dimer photoproduct formation at multiple loci on the DNA indicative of changes in major groove architecture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scientific Reports Springer Journals

Photochemical analysis of structural transitions in DNA liquid crystals reveals differences in spatial structure of DNA molecules organized in liquid crystalline form

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Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s)
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
eISSN
2045-2322
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41598-018-22863-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The anisotropic shape of DNA molecules allows them to form lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) at high concentrations. This liquid crystalline arrangement is also found in vivo (e.g., in bacteriophage capsids, bacteria or human sperm nuclei). However, the role of DNA liquid crystalline organization in living organisms still remains an open question. Here we show that in vitro, the DNA spatial structure is significantly changed in mesophases compared to non-organized DNA molecules. DNA LCs were prepared from pBluescript SK (pBSK) plasmid DNA and investigated by photochemical analysis of structural transitions (PhAST). We reveal significant differences in the probability of UV-induced pyrimidine dimer photoproduct formation at multiple loci on the DNA indicative of changes in major groove architecture.

Journal

Scientific ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 14, 2018

References

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