Phonological involvement in the processing of Japanese at the lexical and sentence levels

Phonological involvement in the processing of Japanese at the lexical and sentence levels The present study examined whether Japanesereaders activate phonological information whenreading kanji compound words and sentences andif so, how they do it. Experiment 1 usedtwo-kanji compound words in a lexical decisiontask to study phonological processing at thelexical level. When nonwords werepseudo-homophones (/roR hi/ in placeof the real word /roR hi/), reactiontimes were longer and more errors occurred thanwith nonwords in the control group(/saku hi/). Experiment 2required participants to detect misspellings(i.e., incorrect kanji combinations) oftwo-kanji compound stimuli embedded insentences. In the detection task of misspelledkanji, no homophonic effect was apparent. Experiment 3 used a semantic decision task. Included in this task were semantically similarbut incorrect kanji compound words used asfillers in sentences (e.g.,meaning `The building you can see over there was facilitated by my friend' instead of designed) as well as the sentences used inExperiment 2. Results from Experiment 3indicated that participants could reject asentence as incorrect more quickly whenpseudo-homophones were embedded in thesentences rather than nonwords. These resultssuggest that readers activate phonologicalinformation of two-kanji compound words whenreading for comprehension but not for simpleproofreading. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reading and Writing Springer Journals

Phonological involvement in the processing of Japanese at the lexical and sentence levels

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Linguistics; Language and Literature; Psycholinguistics; Education, general; Neurology; Literacy
ISSN
0922-4777
eISSN
1573-0905
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1020912217035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study examined whether Japanesereaders activate phonological information whenreading kanji compound words and sentences andif so, how they do it. Experiment 1 usedtwo-kanji compound words in a lexical decisiontask to study phonological processing at thelexical level. When nonwords werepseudo-homophones (/roR hi/ in placeof the real word /roR hi/), reactiontimes were longer and more errors occurred thanwith nonwords in the control group(/saku hi/). Experiment 2required participants to detect misspellings(i.e., incorrect kanji combinations) oftwo-kanji compound stimuli embedded insentences. In the detection task of misspelledkanji, no homophonic effect was apparent. Experiment 3 used a semantic decision task. Included in this task were semantically similarbut incorrect kanji compound words used asfillers in sentences (e.g.,meaning `The building you can see over there was facilitated by my friend' instead of designed) as well as the sentences used inExperiment 2. Results from Experiment 3indicated that participants could reject asentence as incorrect more quickly whenpseudo-homophones were embedded in thesentences rather than nonwords. These resultssuggest that readers activate phonologicalinformation of two-kanji compound words whenreading for comprehension but not for simpleproofreading.

Journal

Reading and WritingSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

References

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