Phenotypic Adaptation of Tonoplast Fluidity to Growth Temperature in the CAM Plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Ham. et Per. is Accompanied by Changes in the Membrane Phospholipid and Protein Composition

Phenotypic Adaptation of Tonoplast Fluidity to Growth Temperature in the CAM Plant Kalanchoë... The present study deals with the phenotypic adaptation of tonoplast fluidity in the CAM plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana to changes in growth temperature. Tonoplast fluidity was characterized by measuring fluorescence depolarization in membranes labeled with fluorescent fatty acid analogues and by following formation of eximeres in membranes labeled by eximere-forming fluorophores. With both techniques it was found that exposure of the plants to higher growth temperature compared with the control decreased the fluidity of the tonoplast while exposure to lower growth temperature caused the opposite. Three hours of high temperature treatment (raised from 25°C to 35°C; ``heat shock'') were sufficient to decrease the tonoplast fluidity to roughly the same extent as growth under high temperature for 30 days. The phenotypic response of tonoplast fluidity to changes in growth temperature was found only in the complete membrane, not however in the lipid matrix deprived of the membrane proteins. Heat treatments of the plants decreased the lipid/protein ratio while exposure to low temperature (for 30 days) increased it. Heat treatments led to a decrease in the percentage of linolenic acid (C18:3) and linoleic acid (C18:2), heat shock and low temperature treatments induced an increase in the percentage of linoleic acid (C18:3), with concomitant decrease in the percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2). However, in the case of heat shock, increase in linolenic acid concerned mainly monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, while with low temperature treatment linoleic acid increased in phosphatidylcholine. Both treatment of the plants with high and low temperature led to a slight decrease in the contribution of phosphatidylcholine and phosphoethanolamine to the total phospholipid content of the tonoplast. High-temperature treatment of the plants not only decreased the phospholipid/protein ratio in the tonoplast, but also led to the occurrence of a 35 kDa polypeptide in the tonoplast which cross-reacted with an antiserum against the tonoplast H+-ATPase holoenzyme. The important role of membrane proteins in bringing about the phenotypic rigidization of the tonoplast was mimicked by reconstitution experiments showing that incorporation of the proteins isolated from the tonoplast into phosphatidylcholine vesicles decreased the fluidity of this membrane system. As to be expected from the analyses in the natural membrane, the degree of this effect depended on the phospholipid/protein ratio. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Phenotypic Adaptation of Tonoplast Fluidity to Growth Temperature in the CAM Plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana Ham. et Per. is Accompanied by Changes in the Membrane Phospholipid and Protein Composition

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/phenotypic-adaptation-of-tonoplast-fluidity-to-growth-temperature-in-3dtm9jo73D
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s002329900447
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study deals with the phenotypic adaptation of tonoplast fluidity in the CAM plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana to changes in growth temperature. Tonoplast fluidity was characterized by measuring fluorescence depolarization in membranes labeled with fluorescent fatty acid analogues and by following formation of eximeres in membranes labeled by eximere-forming fluorophores. With both techniques it was found that exposure of the plants to higher growth temperature compared with the control decreased the fluidity of the tonoplast while exposure to lower growth temperature caused the opposite. Three hours of high temperature treatment (raised from 25°C to 35°C; ``heat shock'') were sufficient to decrease the tonoplast fluidity to roughly the same extent as growth under high temperature for 30 days. The phenotypic response of tonoplast fluidity to changes in growth temperature was found only in the complete membrane, not however in the lipid matrix deprived of the membrane proteins. Heat treatments of the plants decreased the lipid/protein ratio while exposure to low temperature (for 30 days) increased it. Heat treatments led to a decrease in the percentage of linolenic acid (C18:3) and linoleic acid (C18:2), heat shock and low temperature treatments induced an increase in the percentage of linoleic acid (C18:3), with concomitant decrease in the percentage of linoleic acid (C18:2). However, in the case of heat shock, increase in linolenic acid concerned mainly monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, while with low temperature treatment linoleic acid increased in phosphatidylcholine. Both treatment of the plants with high and low temperature led to a slight decrease in the contribution of phosphatidylcholine and phosphoethanolamine to the total phospholipid content of the tonoplast. High-temperature treatment of the plants not only decreased the phospholipid/protein ratio in the tonoplast, but also led to the occurrence of a 35 kDa polypeptide in the tonoplast which cross-reacted with an antiserum against the tonoplast H+-ATPase holoenzyme. The important role of membrane proteins in bringing about the phenotypic rigidization of the tonoplast was mimicked by reconstitution experiments showing that incorporation of the proteins isolated from the tonoplast into phosphatidylcholine vesicles decreased the fluidity of this membrane system. As to be expected from the analyses in the natural membrane, the degree of this effect depended on the phospholipid/protein ratio.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 2, 2014

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off