Phagosome Maturation: A Few Bugs in the System

Phagosome Maturation: A Few Bugs in the System Cells of the innate immune system ingest and destroy invading microorganisms by initially engulfing them into a specialized vacuole, known as the phagosome. The membrane of the forming phagosome is similar to the plasmalemma and its contents resemble the extracellular milieu. As such, the nascent phagosome is not competent to kill and eliminate the ingested microorganisms. However, shortly after sealing, the phagosome undergoes a series of rapid and extensive changes in its composition, the result of a sophisticated sequence of membrane fusion and fission reactions. Understanding the molecular basis of these events is of particular importance, since they are often the target of disruption by intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium, Salmonella and Legionella. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying phagosomal maturation and its subversion by parasitic microorganisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Phagosome Maturation: A Few Bugs in the System

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Philosophy
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-002-2008-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cells of the innate immune system ingest and destroy invading microorganisms by initially engulfing them into a specialized vacuole, known as the phagosome. The membrane of the forming phagosome is similar to the plasmalemma and its contents resemble the extracellular milieu. As such, the nascent phagosome is not competent to kill and eliminate the ingested microorganisms. However, shortly after sealing, the phagosome undergoes a series of rapid and extensive changes in its composition, the result of a sophisticated sequence of membrane fusion and fission reactions. Understanding the molecular basis of these events is of particular importance, since they are often the target of disruption by intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium, Salmonella and Legionella. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying phagosomal maturation and its subversion by parasitic microorganisms.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2003

References

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