Perioperative hypothermia during colectomy: when do patients get cold?

Perioperative hypothermia during colectomy: when do patients get cold? Background Hypothermia has been associated with an increase in the rate of infectious complications following colectomy. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of temperature loss in patients undergoing elective colectomy occurs prior to operation. Methods Temperature data were collected from 105 consecutive patients undergoing elective colectomy at a single institution. Results The study population consisted of 105 patients; 67(64%) male, median age 59 years (range 17–95 years), median 2 2 body mass index 27 kg/m (range 15–48 kg/m ). Median preoperative temperature was 36.7 °C (range 35.2–39.2 °C), drop- ping to 35.7 °C (range 34.0–37.3 °C) immediately following intubation and then rising to 36.2 °C (range 34.0–38.0 °C) prior to leaving the operating room. The median first postoperative temperature was 36.3 °C (range 34.4–37.7 °C). Temperatures were significantly different from one another (p < 0.05, ANOVA), except for the last operative and first postoperative tem- perature. A first postoperative temperature of ≥ 36.0 °C (meeting Surgical Care Improvement criteria Inf-10) was achieved in 78 (74%) of patients. A preoperative temperature of ≥ 36.5 °C was associated with a first postoperative temperature of ≥ 36.0 °C, but operative approach (laparoscopic versus open) was not. Conclusions Most temperature loss occurs prior to operation in patients undergoing colectomy. Patients are rewarmed during the operative procedure. The time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Techniques in Coloproctology Springer Journals

Perioperative hypothermia during colectomy: when do patients get cold?

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Surgery; Gastroenterology; Proctology; Abdominal Surgery; Colorectal Surgery
ISSN
1123-6337
eISSN
1128-045X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10151-018-1793-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Hypothermia has been associated with an increase in the rate of infectious complications following colectomy. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of temperature loss in patients undergoing elective colectomy occurs prior to operation. Methods Temperature data were collected from 105 consecutive patients undergoing elective colectomy at a single institution. Results The study population consisted of 105 patients; 67(64%) male, median age 59 years (range 17–95 years), median 2 2 body mass index 27 kg/m (range 15–48 kg/m ). Median preoperative temperature was 36.7 °C (range 35.2–39.2 °C), drop- ping to 35.7 °C (range 34.0–37.3 °C) immediately following intubation and then rising to 36.2 °C (range 34.0–38.0 °C) prior to leaving the operating room. The median first postoperative temperature was 36.3 °C (range 34.4–37.7 °C). Temperatures were significantly different from one another (p < 0.05, ANOVA), except for the last operative and first postoperative tem- perature. A first postoperative temperature of ≥ 36.0 °C (meeting Surgical Care Improvement criteria Inf-10) was achieved in 78 (74%) of patients. A preoperative temperature of ≥ 36.5 °C was associated with a first postoperative temperature of ≥ 36.0 °C, but operative approach (laparoscopic versus open) was not. Conclusions Most temperature loss occurs prior to operation in patients undergoing colectomy. Patients are rewarmed during the operative procedure. The time

Journal

Techniques in ColoproctologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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