Perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy subjects: a cross-sectional study

Perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation in patients with... Perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness are key factors in the development of suicidal behaviors that have been frequently observed among patients with fibromyalgia. The aim of the present study was to compare these two factors in patients with fibromyalgia with and without suicidal ideation and healthy subjects. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the relationship between these two factors and the secondary variables included in the study, such as depression, sleep quality or the degree of marital adjustment. Perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness were assessed with the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire, depression and suicidal ideation with the Patients Health Questionnaire-9, suicidal risk with the Plutchik Suicide Risk scale, sleep with the Insomnia Severity Index, and marital adjustment with the Locke–Wallace Marital Adjustment scale. Questionnaire scores were compared with the Kruskal–Wallis test. 49 healthy subjects, 38 patients with fibromyalgia without suicidal ideation and 15 patients with fibromyalgia and suicidal ideations were included. Perceived burdensomeness scores were significantly higher in patients with suicidal ideation than in patients without suicidal ideation and controls; thwarted belongingness scores were significantly higher in patients with suicidal ideation than in controls. Marital adjustment was also significantly poor in patients with suicidal ideation than in patients without suicidal ideation and controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia, perceived burdensomeness seems to be strongly related with suicidal ideation, whereas thwarted belongingness seems to play a less relevant role at this respect. Poor marital adjustment could be related with depression. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rheumatology International Springer Journals

Perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation in patients with fibromyalgia and healthy subjects: a cross-sectional study

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Rheumatology
ISSN
0172-8172
eISSN
1437-160X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00296-018-4067-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness are key factors in the development of suicidal behaviors that have been frequently observed among patients with fibromyalgia. The aim of the present study was to compare these two factors in patients with fibromyalgia with and without suicidal ideation and healthy subjects. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the relationship between these two factors and the secondary variables included in the study, such as depression, sleep quality or the degree of marital adjustment. Perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness were assessed with the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire, depression and suicidal ideation with the Patients Health Questionnaire-9, suicidal risk with the Plutchik Suicide Risk scale, sleep with the Insomnia Severity Index, and marital adjustment with the Locke–Wallace Marital Adjustment scale. Questionnaire scores were compared with the Kruskal–Wallis test. 49 healthy subjects, 38 patients with fibromyalgia without suicidal ideation and 15 patients with fibromyalgia and suicidal ideations were included. Perceived burdensomeness scores were significantly higher in patients with suicidal ideation than in patients without suicidal ideation and controls; thwarted belongingness scores were significantly higher in patients with suicidal ideation than in controls. Marital adjustment was also significantly poor in patients with suicidal ideation than in patients without suicidal ideation and controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia, perceived burdensomeness seems to be strongly related with suicidal ideation, whereas thwarted belongingness seems to play a less relevant role at this respect. Poor marital adjustment could be related with depression.

Journal

Rheumatology InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

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