Pelagic cephalopods from eastern Australia: species composition, horizontal and vertical distribution determined from the diets of pelagic fishes

Pelagic cephalopods from eastern Australia: species composition, horizontal and vertical... The distribution and relative biomass of cephalopods from pelagic waters off eastern Australia was examined between 1997 and 2004 from stomach contents of swordfish, yellowfin tuna and dolphinfish taken in the domestic longline fishery. A total of 38 taxa from 19 families were identified. Comparison of the species composition of the three predators indicated pronounced differences in cephalopod species composition. In swordfish, species of the family Ommastrephidae, particularly Ommastrephes bartramii (Lesueur 1821) and Nototodarus gouldi (McCoy 1888) dominated, whereas a more diverse mix of species was identified from yellowfin-sampled cephalopods. Todaropsis eblanae (Ball 1841) was the main cephalopod sampled from the surface-dwelling dolphinfish. For swordfish-sampled cephalopods, significant relationships were found between biomass and season, fluorescence and year. In yellowfin tuna, cephalopod biomass was significantly correlated with season, area and sea surface temperature. Significant factors differed between predator-sampler, possibly reflecting the limits of the predator, but could also give insights into individual cephalopod species distributions. However, the increase in cephalopod biomass over summer in both swordfish and yellowfin tuna suggested cephalopod biomass was higher over summer in the region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Pelagic cephalopods from eastern Australia: species composition, horizontal and vertical distribution determined from the diets of pelagic fishes

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-006-9024-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The distribution and relative biomass of cephalopods from pelagic waters off eastern Australia was examined between 1997 and 2004 from stomach contents of swordfish, yellowfin tuna and dolphinfish taken in the domestic longline fishery. A total of 38 taxa from 19 families were identified. Comparison of the species composition of the three predators indicated pronounced differences in cephalopod species composition. In swordfish, species of the family Ommastrephidae, particularly Ommastrephes bartramii (Lesueur 1821) and Nototodarus gouldi (McCoy 1888) dominated, whereas a more diverse mix of species was identified from yellowfin-sampled cephalopods. Todaropsis eblanae (Ball 1841) was the main cephalopod sampled from the surface-dwelling dolphinfish. For swordfish-sampled cephalopods, significant relationships were found between biomass and season, fluorescence and year. In yellowfin tuna, cephalopod biomass was significantly correlated with season, area and sea surface temperature. Significant factors differed between predator-sampler, possibly reflecting the limits of the predator, but could also give insights into individual cephalopod species distributions. However, the increase in cephalopod biomass over summer in both swordfish and yellowfin tuna suggested cephalopod biomass was higher over summer in the region.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 12, 2006

References

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