Pathways for K+ Efflux in Isolated Surface and Crypt Colonic Cells. Activation by Calcium

Pathways for K+ Efflux in Isolated Surface and Crypt Colonic Cells. Activation by Calcium K+-conductive pathways were evaluated in isolated surface and crypt colonic cells, by measuring 86Rb efflux. In crypt cells, basal K+ efflux (rate constant: 0.24 ± 0.044 min−1, span: 24 ± 1.3%) was inhibited by 30 mM TEA and 5 mM Ba2+ in an additive way, suggesting the existence of two different conductive pathways. Basal efflux was insensitive to apamin, iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin and clotrimazole. Ionomycin (5 μM) stimulated K+ efflux, increasing the rate constant to 0.65 ± 0.007 min−1 and the span to 83 ± 3.2%. Ionomycin-induced K+ efflux was inhibited by clotrimazole (IC 50 of 25 ± 0.4 μM) and charybdotoxin (IC 50 of 65 ± 5.0 nM) and was insensitive to TEA, Ba2+, apamin and iberiotoxin, suggesting that this conductive pathway is related to the Ca2+-activated intermediate-conductance K+ channels (IKca). Absence of extracellular Ca2+ did neither affect basal nor ionomycin-induced K+ efflux. However, intracellular Ca2+ depletion totally inhibited the ionomycin-induced K+ efflux, indicating that the activation of these K+ channels mainly depends on intracellular calcium liberation. K+ efflux was stimulated by intracellular Ca2+ with an EC 50 of 1.1 ± 0.04 μM. In surface cells, K+ efflux (rate constant: 0.17 ± 0.027 min−1; span: 25 ± 3.4%) was insensitive to TEA and Ba2+. However, ionomycin induced K+ efflux with characteristics identical to that observed in crypt cells. In conclusion, both surface and crypt cells present IKCa channels but only crypt cells have TEA- and Ba2+-sensitive conductive pathways, which would determine their participation in colonic K+ secretion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Pathways for K+ Efflux in Isolated Surface and Crypt Colonic Cells. Activation by Calcium

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Human Physiology; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-005-0761-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

K+-conductive pathways were evaluated in isolated surface and crypt colonic cells, by measuring 86Rb efflux. In crypt cells, basal K+ efflux (rate constant: 0.24 ± 0.044 min−1, span: 24 ± 1.3%) was inhibited by 30 mM TEA and 5 mM Ba2+ in an additive way, suggesting the existence of two different conductive pathways. Basal efflux was insensitive to apamin, iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin and clotrimazole. Ionomycin (5 μM) stimulated K+ efflux, increasing the rate constant to 0.65 ± 0.007 min−1 and the span to 83 ± 3.2%. Ionomycin-induced K+ efflux was inhibited by clotrimazole (IC 50 of 25 ± 0.4 μM) and charybdotoxin (IC 50 of 65 ± 5.0 nM) and was insensitive to TEA, Ba2+, apamin and iberiotoxin, suggesting that this conductive pathway is related to the Ca2+-activated intermediate-conductance K+ channels (IKca). Absence of extracellular Ca2+ did neither affect basal nor ionomycin-induced K+ efflux. However, intracellular Ca2+ depletion totally inhibited the ionomycin-induced K+ efflux, indicating that the activation of these K+ channels mainly depends on intracellular calcium liberation. K+ efflux was stimulated by intracellular Ca2+ with an EC 50 of 1.1 ± 0.04 μM. In surface cells, K+ efflux (rate constant: 0.17 ± 0.027 min−1; span: 25 ± 3.4%) was insensitive to TEA and Ba2+. However, ionomycin induced K+ efflux with characteristics identical to that observed in crypt cells. In conclusion, both surface and crypt cells present IKCa channels but only crypt cells have TEA- and Ba2+-sensitive conductive pathways, which would determine their participation in colonic K+ secretion.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

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