Pathological and microbiological findings from mortality of the Chinese giant salamander ( Andrias davidianus )

Pathological and microbiological findings from mortality of the Chinese giant salamander (... The Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus , is a nationally protected and cultured species in China. Recently, a severe epizootic occurred in cultured Chinese giant salamanders in Hubei, Hunan, Sichuan, Shaanxi, and Zhejiang provinces of China, causing substantial economic losses. The typical clinical signs of diseased larval animals were jaw and abdominal swelling and subcutaneous hemorrhaging. Diseased adult animals exhibited skin hemorrhages, ulceration of the hind limbs, and multiple hemorrhagic spots in the visceral organs. Histopathological observation indicated tissue necrosis and cytoplasmic inclusions in the spleen, liver and kidney, suggestive of viral disease. A viral agent was isolated from affected tissues in cell culture. The virus was determined to be pathogenic after experimental infection. Electron microscopy revealed iridovirus-like virions with a size of 140-180 nm in diameter inside the kidney of naturally infected animals and in cell culture. The major capsid protein (MCP) of the virus exhibited 98-99 % sequence identity to ranaviruses. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the virus belonged to the genus Ranavirus . Comparative analysis of the MCP gene sequence with those of other viruses previously isolated from Chinese giant salamanders revealed that these isolates were highly similar, although a few variations were observed. The virus was preliminarily named Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Pathological and microbiological findings from mortality of the Chinese giant salamander ( Andrias davidianus )

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-013-1962-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus , is a nationally protected and cultured species in China. Recently, a severe epizootic occurred in cultured Chinese giant salamanders in Hubei, Hunan, Sichuan, Shaanxi, and Zhejiang provinces of China, causing substantial economic losses. The typical clinical signs of diseased larval animals were jaw and abdominal swelling and subcutaneous hemorrhaging. Diseased adult animals exhibited skin hemorrhages, ulceration of the hind limbs, and multiple hemorrhagic spots in the visceral organs. Histopathological observation indicated tissue necrosis and cytoplasmic inclusions in the spleen, liver and kidney, suggestive of viral disease. A viral agent was isolated from affected tissues in cell culture. The virus was determined to be pathogenic after experimental infection. Electron microscopy revealed iridovirus-like virions with a size of 140-180 nm in diameter inside the kidney of naturally infected animals and in cell culture. The major capsid protein (MCP) of the virus exhibited 98-99 % sequence identity to ranaviruses. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis indicated that the virus belonged to the genus Ranavirus . Comparative analysis of the MCP gene sequence with those of other viruses previously isolated from Chinese giant salamanders revealed that these isolates were highly similar, although a few variations were observed. The virus was preliminarily named Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV).

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2014

References

  • Outbreaks of an iridovirus in marbled sleepy goby, Oxyeleotris marmoratus (Bleeker), cultured in southern China
    Wang, Q; Zeng, WW; Li, KB; Chang, OQ; Liu, C; Wu, GH; Shi, CB; Wu, SQ
  • Iridovirus infections in finfish-critical review with emphasis on ranaviruses
    Whittington, RJ; Becker, JA; Dennis, MM
  • Molecular characterization of iridoviruses isolated from sympatric amphibians and fish
    Mao, JH; Green, DE; Fellers, G; Chinchar, VG
  • Ranavirus-associated mass mortality in wild amphibians, The Netherlands, 2010, a first report
    Kik, M; Martel, A; Sluijs, AS; Pasmans, F; Wohlsein, P; Grone, A; Rijks, JM
  • Outbreak of common midwife toad virus in alpine newts ( Mesotriton alpestris cyreni ) and common midwife toads ( Alytes obstetricans ) in Northern Spain. A comparative pathological study of an emerging ranavirus
    Baslserio, A; Dalton, KP; Cerro, DA; Márquez, I; Parra, F; Prieto, JM; Casais, R

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