Parties and Partisanship: A Brief Introduction

Parties and Partisanship: A Brief Introduction Political Behavior, Vol. 24, No. 2, June 2002 ( 2002) PARTIES AND PARTISANSHIP: A Brief Introduction John G. Geer The controversies surrounding the 2000 presidential election were driven by three forces—partisanship, partisanship, and partisanship (and in that or- der). People who felt that the recount should be stopped in Florida were almost always Republicans, while Democrats thought it was only “fair” that the recount proceed. The reactions and interpretations of the vote in Florida were molded and shaped by one’s partisanship. The influence of this force could be seen in all aspects of our political process, including the legal system. The Supreme Courts of Florida and the United States both showed their partisan stripes. The many battles that followed the closest election in modern times underscored the importance of partisanship and certainly provide the justification for closer inspection of this important political force. Of course, the horrible events of 9-11 made the memories of the 2000 presidential election seemed part of the distant past. Following the events of that horrific day, there was, in effect, a suspension of partisan feelings. Nearly every Republican rallied to the side of President Bush, as one might expect. But so did Democrats and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Behavior Springer Journals

Parties and Partisanship: A Brief Introduction

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Political Science and International Relations; Political Science; Sociology, general
ISSN
0190-9320
eISSN
1573-6687
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1021238323693
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Political Behavior, Vol. 24, No. 2, June 2002 ( 2002) PARTIES AND PARTISANSHIP: A Brief Introduction John G. Geer The controversies surrounding the 2000 presidential election were driven by three forces—partisanship, partisanship, and partisanship (and in that or- der). People who felt that the recount should be stopped in Florida were almost always Republicans, while Democrats thought it was only “fair” that the recount proceed. The reactions and interpretations of the vote in Florida were molded and shaped by one’s partisanship. The influence of this force could be seen in all aspects of our political process, including the legal system. The Supreme Courts of Florida and the United States both showed their partisan stripes. The many battles that followed the closest election in modern times underscored the importance of partisanship and certainly provide the justification for closer inspection of this important political force. Of course, the horrible events of 9-11 made the memories of the 2000 presidential election seemed part of the distant past. Following the events of that horrific day, there was, in effect, a suspension of partisan feelings. Nearly every Republican rallied to the side of President Bush, as one might expect. But so did Democrats and

Journal

Political BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

References

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