Parametric Study of Solder Flux Hygroscopicity: Impact of Weak Organic Acids on Water Layer Formation and Corrosion of Electronics

Parametric Study of Solder Flux Hygroscopicity: Impact of Weak Organic Acids on Water Layer... The presence of solder flux residues on the printed circuit board assembly surface is an important factor contributing to humidity-related reliability issues that affect device lifetime. This investigation focuses on understanding the hygroscopic nature of typical wave solder flux activators—weak organic acids—under varied temperature conditions. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements assessed the effect of high temperature on the crystal structure of organic activators. The hygroscopicity studies were carried out under relative humidity (RH) levels varying from 30% to ∼ 99% and at temperatures 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C. Water absorption levels were determined using the gravimetric method, and the influence on reliability was assessed using electrochemical impedance and leak current measurements performed on the surface insulation resistance comb patterns. The corrosion studies were correlated with the hygroscopicity results and solubility data. Corrosion morphology was analysed using the optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the hygroscopic nature of typical solder flux residue depends on its chemical structure and temperature. An increase of temperature shifts the critical RH level for water vapour absorption towards lower RH range, accelerating the formation of a conductive electrolyte and the occurrence of ion transport-induced electrochemical migration. The overall ranking of flux activators with the increasing order of aggressivity is: palmitic < suberic  < adipic < succinic < glutaric < dl-malic acid. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Electronic Materials Springer Journals

Parametric Study of Solder Flux Hygroscopicity: Impact of Weak Organic Acids on Water Layer Formation and Corrosion of Electronics

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society
Subject
Materials Science; Optical and Electronic Materials; Characterization and Evaluation of Materials; Electronics and Microelectronics, Instrumentation; Solid State Physics
ISSN
0361-5235
eISSN
1543-186X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11664-018-6311-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The presence of solder flux residues on the printed circuit board assembly surface is an important factor contributing to humidity-related reliability issues that affect device lifetime. This investigation focuses on understanding the hygroscopic nature of typical wave solder flux activators—weak organic acids—under varied temperature conditions. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements assessed the effect of high temperature on the crystal structure of organic activators. The hygroscopicity studies were carried out under relative humidity (RH) levels varying from 30% to ∼ 99% and at temperatures 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C. Water absorption levels were determined using the gravimetric method, and the influence on reliability was assessed using electrochemical impedance and leak current measurements performed on the surface insulation resistance comb patterns. The corrosion studies were correlated with the hygroscopicity results and solubility data. Corrosion morphology was analysed using the optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the hygroscopic nature of typical solder flux residue depends on its chemical structure and temperature. An increase of temperature shifts the critical RH level for water vapour absorption towards lower RH range, accelerating the formation of a conductive electrolyte and the occurrence of ion transport-induced electrochemical migration. The overall ranking of flux activators with the increasing order of aggressivity is: palmitic < suberic  < adipic < succinic < glutaric < dl-malic acid.

Journal

Journal of Electronic MaterialsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 26, 2018

References

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