Palaeoecology of Late Carboniferous encrusting chaetetids in North China

Palaeoecology of Late Carboniferous encrusting chaetetids in North China Well-preserved encrusting chaetetids are widespread and easily observed in limestones of the Benxi Formation (Moscovian, Upper Carboniferous) in the Benxi area, eastern Liaoning Province, North China. Chaetetids and colonial corals were the framework-building organisms, with chaetetids as the most common fossils in several small-scale reefs of the study area. The common types of hard substrate encrusted by chaetetids include in situ carbonate hardgrounds, carbonate hardground clasts, calcareous bioclasts and coral skeletons. We have observed lamellar, low domical (mini-domal) and anastomosing lamellar chaetetid morphologies in this fauna. Chaetetids with thin, spreading lamellae are the most common growth forms. Chaetetids employed peripheral, medial and mixed growth strategies to occupy sufficient living space on the substrates. They favoured a shallow, warm and clear marine environment within the photic zone. Chaetetids were later usually smothered by sediments. The chaetetid fossil communities in the Benxi area have a relatively high species diversity, which is not typical of hard substrate marine communities in the Carboniferous. The most common spatial relationship between competing encrusters on hard substrates is the growth of one over the other in the study region. Chaetetids were superior competitors for hard substrate attachment space. This palaeoecological study of chaetetids offers a new example for encrusting organisms on hard substrates of the Carboniferous of China. This research may aid in studying other colonised substrates of the Late Carboniferous. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments Springer Journals

Palaeoecology of Late Carboniferous encrusting chaetetids in North China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/palaeoecology-of-late-carboniferous-encrusting-chaetetids-in-north-LBp13k8XyR
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Earth Sciences; Paleontology; Biodiversity; Animal Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography; Plant Systematics/Taxonomy/Biogeography; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1867-1594
eISSN
1867-1608
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12549-017-0300-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Well-preserved encrusting chaetetids are widespread and easily observed in limestones of the Benxi Formation (Moscovian, Upper Carboniferous) in the Benxi area, eastern Liaoning Province, North China. Chaetetids and colonial corals were the framework-building organisms, with chaetetids as the most common fossils in several small-scale reefs of the study area. The common types of hard substrate encrusted by chaetetids include in situ carbonate hardgrounds, carbonate hardground clasts, calcareous bioclasts and coral skeletons. We have observed lamellar, low domical (mini-domal) and anastomosing lamellar chaetetid morphologies in this fauna. Chaetetids with thin, spreading lamellae are the most common growth forms. Chaetetids employed peripheral, medial and mixed growth strategies to occupy sufficient living space on the substrates. They favoured a shallow, warm and clear marine environment within the photic zone. Chaetetids were later usually smothered by sediments. The chaetetid fossil communities in the Benxi area have a relatively high species diversity, which is not typical of hard substrate marine communities in the Carboniferous. The most common spatial relationship between competing encrusters on hard substrates is the growth of one over the other in the study region. Chaetetids were superior competitors for hard substrate attachment space. This palaeoecological study of chaetetids offers a new example for encrusting organisms on hard substrates of the Carboniferous of China. This research may aid in studying other colonised substrates of the Late Carboniferous.

Journal

Palaeobiodiversity and PalaeoenvironmentsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 20, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off