Oxidative Injury and its Detoxification in Rice Plants after Submergence Stress

Oxidative Injury and its Detoxification in Rice Plants after Submergence Stress Excess toxicity due to oxygen deficiency during natural submergence or flash flooding poses a potential hazard. Oxygen is essential of being alive for all the aerobic organisms. On the other hand, though the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect both positive and negative roles, or that the ROS acts as an oxidative molecule, yet it does have enough potential to cause toxicity in plants, such as rice (Oryza sativa L.) treated as semi-aquatic plant and is adapted to survive submergence for a considerable period of time. Further, rice can withstand submergence stress either by its inherent metabolic adaptations or by keeping its leaves above the water surface by continuously elongating the stem. The present work intends to review the physiological and biochemical adaptations of rice plants on re-oxygenation or re-aeration after the submergence stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological Sciences Springer Journals

Oxidative Injury and its Detoxification in Rice Plants after Submergence Stress

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Publisher
Springer India
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by The National Academy of Sciences, India
Subject
Life Sciences; Life Sciences, general; Behavioral Sciences; Plant Biochemistry; Nucleic Acid Chemistry
ISSN
0369-8211
eISSN
2250-1746
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40011-016-0724-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Excess toxicity due to oxygen deficiency during natural submergence or flash flooding poses a potential hazard. Oxygen is essential of being alive for all the aerobic organisms. On the other hand, though the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect both positive and negative roles, or that the ROS acts as an oxidative molecule, yet it does have enough potential to cause toxicity in plants, such as rice (Oryza sativa L.) treated as semi-aquatic plant and is adapted to survive submergence for a considerable period of time. Further, rice can withstand submergence stress either by its inherent metabolic adaptations or by keeping its leaves above the water surface by continuously elongating the stem. The present work intends to review the physiological and biochemical adaptations of rice plants on re-oxygenation or re-aeration after the submergence stress.

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 19, 2016

References

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