Organizational and environmental factors associated with transfers of nursing home residents to emergency departments

Organizational and environmental factors associated with transfers of nursing home residents to... Background/Objectives The emergency department transfer (EDT) rate of residents from nursing homes (NHs) to emer- gency departments is an important public health issue. The purpose of this study was to examine whether organizational and geographical factors were associated with EDT among older adults living in NHs. Design Retrospective analysis using information from patients’ medical charts regarding hospitalization in the last 12 months. Information came from the baseline data of the IQUARE clinical trial. Participants 5926 residents (86.0 years old, standard deviation, SD = 2.9), from 175 NHs with available data on EDT. Outcome measure The EDT rate was estimated for each NH, from the number of residents who were transferred to an emergency department (one transfer or more) in the previous 12 months. Results 1119 (18.9%, SD = 11.5) residents were transferred to an emergency department at least once during the past year. In adjusted multiple linear regression, NHs located in rural areas had an EDT rate significantly lower than those in urban areas (confidence interval, 95% CI − 10.15, − 2.16, p = 0.003), with an absolute EDT rate of 16.4% (SD = 9.1) versus 20.4% (SD = 12.5); pharmacy for internal use was significantly associated with a lower EDT rate compared with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Geriatric Medicine Springer Journals

Organizational and environmental factors associated with transfers of nursing home residents to emergency departments

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by European Geriatric Medicine Society
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Geriatrics/Gerontology; Internal Medicine
eISSN
1878-7657
D.O.I.
10.1007/s41999-018-0059-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background/Objectives The emergency department transfer (EDT) rate of residents from nursing homes (NHs) to emer- gency departments is an important public health issue. The purpose of this study was to examine whether organizational and geographical factors were associated with EDT among older adults living in NHs. Design Retrospective analysis using information from patients’ medical charts regarding hospitalization in the last 12 months. Information came from the baseline data of the IQUARE clinical trial. Participants 5926 residents (86.0 years old, standard deviation, SD = 2.9), from 175 NHs with available data on EDT. Outcome measure The EDT rate was estimated for each NH, from the number of residents who were transferred to an emergency department (one transfer or more) in the previous 12 months. Results 1119 (18.9%, SD = 11.5) residents were transferred to an emergency department at least once during the past year. In adjusted multiple linear regression, NHs located in rural areas had an EDT rate significantly lower than those in urban areas (confidence interval, 95% CI − 10.15, − 2.16, p = 0.003), with an absolute EDT rate of 16.4% (SD = 9.1) versus 20.4% (SD = 12.5); pharmacy for internal use was significantly associated with a lower EDT rate compared with

Journal

European Geriatric MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: May 8, 2018

References

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