On the optimal height of ionospheric shell for single-site TEC estimation

On the optimal height of ionospheric shell for single-site TEC estimation The ionospheric shell height has an impact on the estimated differential code bias (DCB) and total electron content (TEC) obtained by global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data, especially for a single site. However, the shell height is generally considered as a fixed value. Based on data from the international GNSS service (IGS), we propose the concept of optimal ionospheric shell height, which minimizes |ΔDCB| when compared to the DCB provided by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). Based on the data from five IGS stations at high, middle, and low latitudes during the time 2003–2013, we investigate the variation in the optimal ionospheric shell height and its relation with the solar activity. Results indicate that the relation between the mean of the optimal ionospheric shell height and the latitude is N-shaped. At the three stations at midlatitude, the mean value almost increases linearly with the latitude. The optimal ionospheric shell heights show 11-year and 1-year periods. The influences of the solar activity are related to the means of the optimal ionospheric shell height during the time 2003–2013. The slope of the linear fitting decreases with the mean value. Using the data from 2003 to 2013, we estimate the daily optimal ionospheric shell heights for 2014 by using the Fourier fitting method and then calculate the daily average of ΔDCB of the observed satellites by comparing to CODE results. The statistical results of the daily average in 2014 show that the optimal ionospheric shell height is much better than the fixed one. From the high-latitude station to the low-latitude station, the improvements in the mean value are about 75, 92, 96, 50, and 88% and the root-mean-squares are reduced by about 0.16, 2.09, 2.01, 1.01, and 0.02 TECu, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GPS Solutions Springer Journals

On the optimal height of ionospheric shell for single-site TEC estimation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/on-the-optimal-height-of-ionospheric-shell-for-single-site-tec-qH0mEdQqst
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geophysics/Geodesy; Atmospheric Sciences; Space Sciences (including Extraterrestrial Physics, Space Exploration and Astronautics) ; Automotive Engineering; Electrical Engineering
ISSN
1080-5370
eISSN
1521-1886
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10291-018-0715-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ionospheric shell height has an impact on the estimated differential code bias (DCB) and total electron content (TEC) obtained by global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data, especially for a single site. However, the shell height is generally considered as a fixed value. Based on data from the international GNSS service (IGS), we propose the concept of optimal ionospheric shell height, which minimizes |ΔDCB| when compared to the DCB provided by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). Based on the data from five IGS stations at high, middle, and low latitudes during the time 2003–2013, we investigate the variation in the optimal ionospheric shell height and its relation with the solar activity. Results indicate that the relation between the mean of the optimal ionospheric shell height and the latitude is N-shaped. At the three stations at midlatitude, the mean value almost increases linearly with the latitude. The optimal ionospheric shell heights show 11-year and 1-year periods. The influences of the solar activity are related to the means of the optimal ionospheric shell height during the time 2003–2013. The slope of the linear fitting decreases with the mean value. Using the data from 2003 to 2013, we estimate the daily optimal ionospheric shell heights for 2014 by using the Fourier fitting method and then calculate the daily average of ΔDCB of the observed satellites by comparing to CODE results. The statistical results of the daily average in 2014 show that the optimal ionospheric shell height is much better than the fixed one. From the high-latitude station to the low-latitude station, the improvements in the mean value are about 75, 92, 96, 50, and 88% and the root-mean-squares are reduced by about 0.16, 2.09, 2.01, 1.01, and 0.02 TECu, respectively.

Journal

GPS SolutionsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 23, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off