On Factors Affecting the Performance of Dynamically Groomed Optical WDM Mesh Networks

On Factors Affecting the Performance of Dynamically Groomed Optical WDM Mesh Networks In this paper, we consider the problem of traffic grooming in optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) mesh topology-based networks, under dynamic traffic conditions. Individual channels in a WDM network have capacities of up to 40 Gbps and are expected to increase further. However, individual connections (or sessions) typically do not require the entire wavelength capacity. Thus, allocating a lightpath with a full wavelength capacity for a single connection results in low bandwidth utilization. One way to solve this is by using electronic SONET add-drop multiplexers (SADMs) at each node to multiplex several low-rate connections on to the high-capacity wavelength channel, and provision them as a single lightpath. This is referred to as traffic grooming. However, SADMs are costly devices and it is expensive to equip each port and wavelength in every node with grooming capabilities. This leads to the concept of limited grooming that requires fewer SADMs at the nodes: only a subset of the ports and wavelengths will be equipped with SADMs. In this paper, we propose four different limited grooming node architectures and develop grooming policies for each architecture. We also conduct a systematic performance evaluation of a limited grooming optical network supporting dynamic traffic requests. We consider the effect of several important factors including: the connection granularity, traffic grooming policy, the number of SADMs at a node, the grooming port tunability and wavelength conversion. The results indicate that limited grooming at each node is sufficient to attain the performance obtained with full grooming, especially when connections occupy a small fraction of the wavelength capacity. Further, the connection granularity, the grooming policy and the number of wavelengths used per link for a connection are also seen to have a significant effect on the blocking performance. Interestingly, the SADM tunability and the port-sharing architecture are not seen to have a significant impact on the performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photonic Network Communications Springer Journals

On Factors Affecting the Performance of Dynamically Groomed Optical WDM Mesh Networks

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Computer Science; Computer Communication Networks; Electrical Engineering; Characterization and Evaluation of Materials
ISSN
1387-974X
eISSN
1572-8188
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11107-006-0011-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper, we consider the problem of traffic grooming in optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) mesh topology-based networks, under dynamic traffic conditions. Individual channels in a WDM network have capacities of up to 40 Gbps and are expected to increase further. However, individual connections (or sessions) typically do not require the entire wavelength capacity. Thus, allocating a lightpath with a full wavelength capacity for a single connection results in low bandwidth utilization. One way to solve this is by using electronic SONET add-drop multiplexers (SADMs) at each node to multiplex several low-rate connections on to the high-capacity wavelength channel, and provision them as a single lightpath. This is referred to as traffic grooming. However, SADMs are costly devices and it is expensive to equip each port and wavelength in every node with grooming capabilities. This leads to the concept of limited grooming that requires fewer SADMs at the nodes: only a subset of the ports and wavelengths will be equipped with SADMs. In this paper, we propose four different limited grooming node architectures and develop grooming policies for each architecture. We also conduct a systematic performance evaluation of a limited grooming optical network supporting dynamic traffic requests. We consider the effect of several important factors including: the connection granularity, traffic grooming policy, the number of SADMs at a node, the grooming port tunability and wavelength conversion. The results indicate that limited grooming at each node is sufficient to attain the performance obtained with full grooming, especially when connections occupy a small fraction of the wavelength capacity. Further, the connection granularity, the grooming policy and the number of wavelengths used per link for a connection are also seen to have a significant effect on the blocking performance. Interestingly, the SADM tunability and the port-sharing architecture are not seen to have a significant impact on the performance.

Journal

Photonic Network CommunicationsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 18, 2006

References

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