Occupational heat exposure among municipal workers

Occupational heat exposure among municipal workers Purpose Outdoor workers face elevated and prolonged heat exposures and have limited access to air-conditioned spaces. This study’s overarching research aim is to increase knowledge of municipal worker heat exposure and adaptation practices. The study’s sub-objectives are: (1) quantifying exposure misclassification from estimating personal heat exposure from the official weather station; (2) surveying worker’s knowledge and practices to adapt to extreme heat; and (3) relating heat exposure and adaptation practices to self-reported thermal comfort. Methods Participants wore a personal heat exposure sensor over 7 days from June 1st to July 3rd, 2015 in Tallahassee, Florida US. Next, participants confirmed the days that they wore the sensor and reported their daily thermal comfort and heat adaptations. Finally, participants completed an extreme heat knowledge, attitudes, and practices survey. Results Some participants (37%) experienced hotter and more humid conditions (heat index > 2) than the weather station. The most common heat adaptations were staying hydrated (85%), wearing a hat (46%), and seeking shade (40%). During work hours, higher temperatures increased the odds (odds ratio: 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.41, p = 0.016) of a participant feeling too hot. Shifting work duty indoors made workers to feel more comfortable (odds ratio: 0.28, 95% http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health Springer Journals
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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environmental Health; Rehabilitation; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine
ISSN
0340-0131
eISSN
1432-1246
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00420-018-1318-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Outdoor workers face elevated and prolonged heat exposures and have limited access to air-conditioned spaces. This study’s overarching research aim is to increase knowledge of municipal worker heat exposure and adaptation practices. The study’s sub-objectives are: (1) quantifying exposure misclassification from estimating personal heat exposure from the official weather station; (2) surveying worker’s knowledge and practices to adapt to extreme heat; and (3) relating heat exposure and adaptation practices to self-reported thermal comfort. Methods Participants wore a personal heat exposure sensor over 7 days from June 1st to July 3rd, 2015 in Tallahassee, Florida US. Next, participants confirmed the days that they wore the sensor and reported their daily thermal comfort and heat adaptations. Finally, participants completed an extreme heat knowledge, attitudes, and practices survey. Results Some participants (37%) experienced hotter and more humid conditions (heat index > 2) than the weather station. The most common heat adaptations were staying hydrated (85%), wearing a hat (46%), and seeking shade (40%). During work hours, higher temperatures increased the odds (odds ratio: 1.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.41, p = 0.016) of a participant feeling too hot. Shifting work duty indoors made workers to feel more comfortable (odds ratio: 0.28, 95%

Journal

International Archives of Occupational and Environmental HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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