Observation of the Kaiser Effect Using Noble Gas Release Signals

Observation of the Kaiser Effect Using Noble Gas Release Signals Rock Mech Rock Eng (2018) 51:647–651 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-017-1324-x TECHNICAL NOTE Stephen J. Bauer   Received: 15 June 2017 / Accepted: 12 September 2017 / Published online: 24 October 2017 © Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria (outside the USA) 2017 1 Introduction The test assembly (Fig. 1), system and procedures are those used by Bauer et al. (2016a, b). A right circular cylin- The Kaiser effect was defined in the early 1950s (Kaiser drical specimen 3.8 cm in diameter and 7.7 cm in length was prepared to ASTM specifications from a core taken about 1953) and was extensively reviewed and evaluated by Lavrov (2002) with a view toward understanding stress estimations. 25 m below the surface, well below the surface-weathered zone. The Kaiser effect is a stress memory phenomenon which has most often been demonstrated in rock using acoustic The premise of seeking to detect acoustic emissions is simple. As the rock is deformed, grains and grain boundaries emissions. During cyclic loading–unloading–reloading, the acoustic emissions are near zero until the load exceeds the will fracture as stress is increased, generating acoustic waves (sound). The acoustic wave then travels omnidirectionally level of the previous load cycle. We sought to explore the Kaiser effect in rock using real-time noble gas release. Labo http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering Springer Journals

Observation of the Kaiser Effect Using Noble Gas Release Signals

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria (outside the USA)
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geophysics/Geodesy; Civil Engineering
ISSN
0723-2632
eISSN
1434-453X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00603-017-1324-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rock Mech Rock Eng (2018) 51:647–651 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-017-1324-x TECHNICAL NOTE Stephen J. Bauer   Received: 15 June 2017 / Accepted: 12 September 2017 / Published online: 24 October 2017 © Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria (outside the USA) 2017 1 Introduction The test assembly (Fig. 1), system and procedures are those used by Bauer et al. (2016a, b). A right circular cylin- The Kaiser effect was defined in the early 1950s (Kaiser drical specimen 3.8 cm in diameter and 7.7 cm in length was prepared to ASTM specifications from a core taken about 1953) and was extensively reviewed and evaluated by Lavrov (2002) with a view toward understanding stress estimations. 25 m below the surface, well below the surface-weathered zone. The Kaiser effect is a stress memory phenomenon which has most often been demonstrated in rock using acoustic The premise of seeking to detect acoustic emissions is simple. As the rock is deformed, grains and grain boundaries emissions. During cyclic loading–unloading–reloading, the acoustic emissions are near zero until the load exceeds the will fracture as stress is increased, generating acoustic waves (sound). The acoustic wave then travels omnidirectionally level of the previous load cycle. We sought to explore the Kaiser effect in rock using real-time noble gas release. Labo

Journal

Rock Mechanics and Rock EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 24, 2017

References

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