Obituary

Obituary Arch Virol (2003) 148: 1655–1657 DOI 10.1007/s00705-003-0151-4 In Memoriam Harold S. Ginsberg (1917–2003) arold S. Ginsberg, a pioneer in the field of H infectious diseases and molecular virology, died on February 2nd, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Harold (or Harry as he was almost universally known in the virology community) was born on May 27, 1917 in Daytona Beach, Florida. He was an undergraduate at Duke University, graduating with an AB in 1937. He then attended Tulane University and earned his MD in 1941. Following his Internship and Residency training, he served in the military and was posted to the United Kingdom at the time of the Normandy landings. During this period, he noticed a high occurrence of hepatitis in soldiers who had received blood transfusions. His investigations led to the discovery that the pooled plasma that was being used to treat the wounded was causing hepatitis. This work led to changes in medical treatments that saved the lives of many servicemen in World War II. It also stimulated research efforts that eventually led to the discovery and isolation of Hepatitis B virus. For his efforts, Harry was awarded the Legion of Merit Award by the US Army in 1945. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Obituary

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Springer-Verlag/Wien
Subject
LifeSciences
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-003-0151-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arch Virol (2003) 148: 1655–1657 DOI 10.1007/s00705-003-0151-4 In Memoriam Harold S. Ginsberg (1917–2003) arold S. Ginsberg, a pioneer in the field of H infectious diseases and molecular virology, died on February 2nd, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Harold (or Harry as he was almost universally known in the virology community) was born on May 27, 1917 in Daytona Beach, Florida. He was an undergraduate at Duke University, graduating with an AB in 1937. He then attended Tulane University and earned his MD in 1941. Following his Internship and Residency training, he served in the military and was posted to the United Kingdom at the time of the Normandy landings. During this period, he noticed a high occurrence of hepatitis in soldiers who had received blood transfusions. His investigations led to the discovery that the pooled plasma that was being used to treat the wounded was causing hepatitis. This work led to changes in medical treatments that saved the lives of many servicemen in World War II. It also stimulated research efforts that eventually led to the discovery and isolation of Hepatitis B virus. For his efforts, Harry was awarded the Legion of Merit Award by the US Army in 1945.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2003

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