Obesity’s impact on survival is independent of dose adjustments in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer

Obesity’s impact on survival is independent of dose adjustments in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in... Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (2018) 168:285 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4590-0 LE T TER TO  THE   EDITOR Obesity’s impact on survival is independent of dose adjustments in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer 1 2 2 Ying L. Liu  · Eileen P. Connolly  · Kevin Kalinsky Received: 17 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published online: 24 November 2017 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017 To the Editor, (lumpectomy vs. mastectomy) or radiation therapy rates as compared to women with normal weight (BMI 18.5 to < 25) Dr. Altundag’s comment brings to attention an important and BSA < 2.2, p > 0.05. This suggests that obesity’s nega- question about whether part of obesity’s negative impact on tive impact on survival is independent of chemotherapeutic survival in women with breast cancer receiving adriamy- dosing. cin/taxane-based chemotherapy is due to dose reduction in the cytotoxic systemic therapy. They cite a recent study by Karatas et al. in which chemotherapy doses were capped at References a body surface area (BSA) of 2 m and were not uniformly 1. Karatas F, Erdem GU, Sahin S et al (2017) Obesity is an inde- based on a patient’s exact BSA, potentially contributing to pendent prognostic factor of decreased pathological complete obesity’s negative impact on survival [1]. In our study [2], response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. we also evaluated this concept. Of the 273 women included Breast (Edinb Scotl) 32:237–244 in our study, 10 patients had high BSA (≥ 2.2) and 14 were 2. Liu YL, Saraf A, Catanese B et al (2017) Obesity and survival in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting: role of tumor subtype in an morbidly obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 40], but none of ethnically diverse population. Breast Cancer Res Treat. https:// these women had reductions in their chemotherapy doses. doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4507-y In addition, there were no differences in the type of surgery This is a letter to the editor submitted in response to Dr. Kadri Altundag’s letter to the editor titled “Dose adjustment in obese breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy might have an impact on survival” which was published by this journal online on October 23rd, 2017. * Kevin Kalinsky kk2693@columbia.edu Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Vol.:(0123456789) 1 3 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Springer Journals

Obesity’s impact on survival is independent of dose adjustments in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Oncology
ISSN
0167-6806
eISSN
1573-7217
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10549-017-4590-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Breast Cancer Research and Treatment (2018) 168:285 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4590-0 LE T TER TO  THE   EDITOR Obesity’s impact on survival is independent of dose adjustments in neoadjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer 1 2 2 Ying L. Liu  · Eileen P. Connolly  · Kevin Kalinsky Received: 17 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published online: 24 November 2017 © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017 To the Editor, (lumpectomy vs. mastectomy) or radiation therapy rates as compared to women with normal weight (BMI 18.5 to < 25) Dr. Altundag’s comment brings to attention an important and BSA < 2.2, p > 0.05. This suggests that obesity’s nega- question about whether part of obesity’s negative impact on tive impact on survival is independent of chemotherapeutic survival in women with breast cancer receiving adriamy- dosing. cin/taxane-based chemotherapy is due to dose reduction in the cytotoxic systemic therapy. They cite a recent study by Karatas et al. in which chemotherapy doses were capped at References a body surface area (BSA) of 2 m and were not uniformly 1. Karatas F, Erdem GU, Sahin S et al (2017) Obesity is an inde- based on a patient’s exact BSA, potentially contributing to pendent prognostic factor of decreased pathological complete obesity’s negative impact on survival [1]. In our study [2], response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. we also evaluated this concept. Of the 273 women included Breast (Edinb Scotl) 32:237–244 in our study, 10 patients had high BSA (≥ 2.2) and 14 were 2. Liu YL, Saraf A, Catanese B et al (2017) Obesity and survival in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting: role of tumor subtype in an morbidly obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 40], but none of ethnically diverse population. Breast Cancer Res Treat. https:// these women had reductions in their chemotherapy doses. doi.org/10.1007/s10549-017-4507-y In addition, there were no differences in the type of surgery This is a letter to the editor submitted in response to Dr. Kadri Altundag’s letter to the editor titled “Dose adjustment in obese breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy might have an impact on survival” which was published by this journal online on October 23rd, 2017. * Kevin Kalinsky kk2693@columbia.edu Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Vol.:(0123456789) 1 3

Journal

Breast Cancer Research and TreatmentSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 24, 2017

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