Obesity and Stress Urinary Incontinence: Impact on Pathophysiology and Treatment

Obesity and Stress Urinary Incontinence: Impact on Pathophysiology and Treatment Purpose of Review Obesity is highly prevalent and is associated with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The purposes of this review are to assess the pathophysiology of SUI in the obese female and review the outcomes of weight loss and anti- incontinence surgery in this population. Recent Findings While increased intra-abdominal pressure appears to be the common pathophysiologic link between obesity and SUI, neurogenic and metabolic pathways have been proposed. Both surgical and non-surgical weight loss continue to have beneficial effects on SUI; however, long-term outcomes are largely absent. Midurethral sling (MUS) surgery is largely effective in the obese population, with a complication profile similar to that in non-obese women. Obesity has been shown to be a risk factor for failure of MUS. Summary While weight loss should be the primary modality to improve SUI in the obese woman, MUS remains an effective and safe option in those women undertaking surgery. . . . . Keywords Stress urinary incontinence Obesity Weight loss Surgery Complications Introduction home state of Louisiana, the statistics are direr. According to 2016 CDC data, 69% of Louisiana adults are overweight or The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) de- obese [3], and in 2015, Louisiana http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Urology Reports Springer Journals

Obesity and Stress Urinary Incontinence: Impact on Pathophysiology and Treatment

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology; Nephrology
ISSN
1527-2737
eISSN
1534-6285
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11934-018-0762-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Obesity is highly prevalent and is associated with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The purposes of this review are to assess the pathophysiology of SUI in the obese female and review the outcomes of weight loss and anti- incontinence surgery in this population. Recent Findings While increased intra-abdominal pressure appears to be the common pathophysiologic link between obesity and SUI, neurogenic and metabolic pathways have been proposed. Both surgical and non-surgical weight loss continue to have beneficial effects on SUI; however, long-term outcomes are largely absent. Midurethral sling (MUS) surgery is largely effective in the obese population, with a complication profile similar to that in non-obese women. Obesity has been shown to be a risk factor for failure of MUS. Summary While weight loss should be the primary modality to improve SUI in the obese woman, MUS remains an effective and safe option in those women undertaking surgery. . . . . Keywords Stress urinary incontinence Obesity Weight loss Surgery Complications Introduction home state of Louisiana, the statistics are direr. According to 2016 CDC data, 69% of Louisiana adults are overweight or The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) de- obese [3], and in 2015, Louisiana

Journal

Current Urology ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 22, 2018

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